Benefits

  • June 27, 2024

    11th Circ. Upholds Radiology Practice's FMLA Suit Win

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday backed a Florida radiology practice's defeat of a doctor's lawsuit alleging he was fired because he requested medical leave, ruling a lower court didn't err when it blocked him from presenting evidence he hadn't previously disclosed.

  • June 27, 2024

    6th Circ. Dismisses Doctors' ACA Trans Healthcare Appeal

    The Sixth Circuit dismissed on Thursday an appeal from a group of doctors attempting to block the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services from enforcing prohibitions on gender-identity discrimination under the Affordable Care Act, finding subsequent agency action overruled the doctors' claims.

  • June 27, 2024

    DOL Benefits Chief Defends Fiduciary Rule Before GOP Panel

    The head of the U.S. Department of Labor's employee benefits agency on Thursday defended recently finalized policy expanding the definition of a fiduciary under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, drawing criticism from a Republican-controlled panel of House lawmakers at an oversight hearing.

  • June 27, 2024

    Yale Tells 2nd Circ. Workers Aren't Owed ERISA Jury Trial

    Yale University told the Second Circuit a group of workers can't be granted a new jury trial in their suit claiming their $5.5 billion retirement plan was loaded with high fees, stating high court precedent says they're ineligible for a jury trial under the relief they're seeking.

  • June 26, 2024

    BofA COVID Benefit Card Suit Trimmed After Prior Order Axed

    A California federal judge has trimmed a suit brought against Bank of America NA by a proposed class of unemployment and disability benefits card recipients while also agreeing with them that a federal magistrate judge erred in holding that the bank's top brass lacked "uniquely relevant information" concerning discovery in the suit.

  • June 26, 2024

    VA Can't 'Short-Circuit' Racial Bias Suit With Appeal, Vet Says

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs should not be allowed to challenge a Connecticut federal judge's decision to let a Black Marine Corps veteran proceed with his systemic-discrimination suit against the department because it has not met the standards for lodging an interlocutory appeal, the plaintiffs have argued.

  • June 26, 2024

    Ex-Philly Labor Leader Gets 4-Year Embezzlement Sentence

    Brian Burrows, formerly the president of Philadelphia's International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98, has been sentenced to four years of prison and three years of probation for his role in an embezzlement scheme alongside fellow union exec John "Johnny Doc" Dougherty, prosecutors announced Wednesday.

  • June 26, 2024

    Conn. Insurance Chief Can Limit Struggling Insurer's Payouts

    A Connecticut state court imposed a temporary moratorium on certain benefits that a private equity-owned life insurer can pay out to policyholders until a rehabilitation plan can be confirmed for the failing carrier, granting the state insurance department's petition for a rehabilitation order.

  • June 26, 2024

    Veteran Says Starbucks Fired Him Over Parental Leave

    Starbucks retaliated against an Army veteran who took time off after the birth of his child by firing him during a Teams call, a lawsuit in Washington federal court claims.

  • June 26, 2024

    CSAA Seeks Exit From Conn. Atty's $1.4M Transfer Scam Case

    The insurance company covering a Connecticut attorney accused of helping steal $1.4 million from a development company via a fraudulent bank transfer is seeking to drop its coverage on the grounds that the attorney's alleged actions were intentional and criminal, and therefore not insured.

  • June 26, 2024

    Feds' 5th Circ. Win On Preventive Care May Imperil ACA

    The Fifth Circuit's decision to knock out a national injunction against preventive services coverage requirements under the Affordable Care Act left healthcare advocates breathing a sigh of relief, but attorneys say even more of those requirements may be on the chopping block.

  • June 26, 2024

    Biden Pardons Veterans Convicted For LGBTQI+ Status

    President Joe Biden on Wednesday pardoned thousands of LGBTQI+ military veterans who were convicted of crimes and forced out of the military across more than 60 years based solely on their sexual orientation or gender identity.

  • June 25, 2024

    Public Pensions Have Personnel Authority, Calif. Panel Rules

    A county public employee retirement system has the authority to create employment classifications and set its employees' salaries, a California appellate court ruled Monday, reviving the Los Angeles County Employees Retirement Association's lawsuit seeking confirmation of its authority to make key personnel decisions.

  • June 25, 2024

    7th Circ. Backs State Farm's Employment Suit Coverage Win

    State Farm is off the hook for a dispute between the former president of the College of DuPage and the board that fired and allegedly defamed him, the Seventh Circuit said, affirming a lower court's finding that another insurer should cover the litigation and $4 million settlement.

  • June 25, 2024

    Healthcare Co. Inks $1.5M Deal To End Pension Fund Suit

    A Massachusetts healthcare company has agreed to pay $1.5 million to end a class action alleging it loaded its $500 million pension plan with costly investments and failed to keep administrative fees in check, plan participants leading the suit told a federal court.

  • June 25, 2024

    Breaking IP Barriers: Q&A With Harrity's Elaine Spector

    Harrity & Harrity LLP partner Elaine Spector has helped shape multiple firms' leave policies after watching other parents face pressure to work shortly after having a child.

  • June 25, 2024

    Ga. Panel OKs COVID Aid To Atty Who Cared For 2 Young Kids

    A Georgia attorney who left his legal job to be the primary caregiver for his young children during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic should have qualified for the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program, a state appeals panel has ruled, overturning the state's decision to deny benefits.

  • June 24, 2024

    Health Co. Narrows Doctor's Reneged Benefits Suit

    An Arizona federal judge trimmed a doctor's suit claiming her healthcare system employer refused to let her use her benefits to take time off to undergo cancer treatments, but kept alive claims that the company violated state and federal law by misleading her about paid leave.

  • June 24, 2024

    Teamsters Fund Must Face Pension Conversion Suit

    A West Coast-based Teamsters pension fund must keep facing claims that it shortchanged married retirees by using outdated data to convert their benefits from single-life annuity form, with a Washington federal judge deeming the suit strong enough to beat the fund's dismissal motion.

  • June 24, 2024

    Doctor Left Text Trail Describing NBA Fraud Scheme, Jury Told

    Prosecutors told a Manhattan federal jury that a Seattle medical professional sent a series of text messages detailing a plan to submit fraudulent claims to an NBA healthcare plan to obtain payouts, kicking off a second trial over the alleged scheme.

  • June 24, 2024

    Boeing Says Turbulent Securities Suit Should Be Dismissed

    Boeing has moved to dismiss a proposed securities fraud suit in Virginia federal court accusing it of misleading investors about the overall safety of its 737 Max jets, saying that the plaintiffs' "kitchen-sink" approach falls short of pleading requirements.

  • June 24, 2024

    McDermott Investors See Partial Cert. In $6B CB&I Deal Suit

    Investors in energy industry engineering company McDermott International Inc. saw part of their proposed investor class certified as a lead plaintiff is sought for a second subclass in litigation over the company's $6 billion acquisition of Chicago Bridge & Iron Company NV.

  • June 24, 2024

    PNC Beats ERISA Suit After Class Expert Found Unreliable

    PNC escaped a certified class action alleging it let employee retirement fund participants pay excessive fees after a Pennsylvania federal judge on Friday ruled that an expert witness who calculated $25 million in damages for the class of current and former employees wasn't reliable.

  • June 24, 2024

    Waste Management Co. Will Pay $395K To End 401(k) Fee Suit

    Waste management company Clean Harbors Environmental Services Inc. will pay $395,000 to resolve a proposed class action alleging it mismanaged its $813 million employee retirement plan by failing to look for less expensive funds, according to a Friday filing.

  • June 24, 2024

    DOL Still Mulling Changes To Pension De-Risking Guidance

    The U.S. Department of Labor told Congress in a new report Monday it hasn't ruled out changing guidance used by retirement plan managers when selecting an annuity provider for pension de-risking transactions, which involve the exchange of defined benefit pension plan liabilities for annuity insurance contracts.

Expert Analysis

  • Del. Match.com Ruling Maintains Precedent In Time Of Change

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    Despite speculation that the Delaware Supreme Court could drive away corporations if it lowered the bar for business judgment review in its Match.com stockholder ruling, the court broke its recent run of controversial precedent-busting decisions by upholding, and arguably strengthening, minority stockholder protections against controller coercion, say Renee Zaytsev and Marc Ayala at Boies Schiller.

  • Inside OMB's Update On Race And Ethnicity Data Collection

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    The Office of Management and Budget's new guidelines for agency collection of data on race and ethnicity reflect societal changes and the concerns of certain demographics, but implementation may be significantly burdensome for agencies and employers, say Joanna Colosimo and Bill Osterndorf at DCI Consulting.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Management Incentives May Be Revisited After PE Investment

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    As the economic climate shifts, key parties in private equity investment transactions may become misaligned, and management incentive plans could become ineffective — so attentive boards may wish to caucus with management to evaluate continued alignment, say Austin Lilling and Nida Javaid at Morgan Lewis.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 2 Recent Suits Show Resiliency Of Medicare Drug Price Law

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    Though pharmaceutical companies continue to file lawsuits challenging the Inflation Reduction Act, which enables the federal government to negotiate for lower prescription drug prices, recent decisions suggest that the reduced drug prices are likely here to stay, says Jose Vela Jr. at Clark Hill.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • How American Airlines ESG Case Could Alter ERISA Liability

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    Spence v. American Airlines, a Texas federal case over the airline's selection of multiple investment funds in its retirement plan, threatens to upend the Employee Retirement Income Security Act's legal framework for fiduciary liability in the name of curtailing environmental, social and governance-related activities, say attorneys at Mayer Brown.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

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