Commercial Litigation UK

  • July 04, 2024

    Freeths Says Funder's Loan Negligence Claim Is Time-Barred

    Freeths LLP has hit back at a professional negligence case brought by a litigation-funder, arguing that it waited too long to claim that the law firm left the owner of a quarrying business liable to repay a £250,000 ($320,000) loan.

  • July 04, 2024

    Lawyer Heckled Secretary With Sexist Remarks, Tribunal Says

    A former legal secretary has won her sexual harassment claim against her former firm in an English tribunal after the panel ruled that its leading solicitor had made her distressed, including by telling her he had found a condom used by his partner's paramour.

  • July 04, 2024

    WSJ Publisher Dow Jones Must Face Bankers' GDPR Claims

    The Wall Street Journal publisher Dow Jones has failed to strike out data protection allegations brought against it by two investment bankers as a London court found the claims were not a tactic to avoid the difficulties of bringing a defamation claim.

  • July 04, 2024

    Pope Aide Says Vatican 'Trapped' By UK Property Deal

    A close aide to the pope testified Thursday that he authorized payments of Є15 million ($16.2 million) to an Italian broker to regain full ownership for the Vatican of a London building at the heart a now-notorious property deal.

  • July 04, 2024

    Lender Hits Elite Law For £1.9M Over Alleged Loan Breach

    A lender has sued Elite Law Solicitors after it allegedly failed to spot that its client was a fraud and did not secure necessary protections over a £1.9 million ($2.4 million) property loan, telling a court that this has left it unable to recover its cash.

  • July 04, 2024

    Emirati Scrap Metal Sellers Lied To Secure $45M Loan

    A Dubai shipping broker and his son made false and fraudulent representations when they secured a $45 million loan arrangement from a Norwegian security agent and other lenders, a London court has ruled.

  • July 04, 2024

    Nokia Accuses Amazon Of 'Hijacking' Infringement Case

    A Nokia subsidiary asked a London court on Thursday to strike out Amazon's attempt to compel it to license patents for Prime Video, arguing that the U.S. multinational had "hijacked" its infringement claim over the technology to force it into a deal.

  • July 04, 2024

    Gas Site Manager Unfairly Sacked After Finding Next Job

    An employment tribunal has ruled that a gas mains servicing company unfairly dismissed one of its managers by making him redundant when it discovered he had already found a new job.

  • July 04, 2024

    Tech Co. Knew IP Woes From Soured Deal, AI Video Biz Says

    An AI video analytics business has told a London court that a security technology company it accused of failing to pay up after acquiring its intellectual property should have been aware that its CCTV-analyzing technology might contain bugs.

  • July 03, 2024

    NHS Consultant Surgeon Wins Unfair Dismissal Case

    An NHS trust forced a world-renowned surgeon to quit after making him step down from a role and restricting his ability to practice without first investigating bullying allegations against him, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • July 03, 2024

    Ex-Post Office Chair Says Legal Review Buried On Advice

    The former chair of the U.K.'s Post Office told a London inquiry Wednesday that he had not shared a legal review of prosecutions of subpostmasters due to advice that it would be legally privileged, despite warnings in the report that some of the convictions may have been unsafe.

  • July 03, 2024

    Ericsson Prefers US FRAND Terms, Rejects Lenovo Attacks

    Ericsson has fought claims that it refuses to negotiate fair licensing terms with Lenovo and abuses its ownership of standard essential patents for 5G technologies, the latest development in a long-running feud between the companies.

  • July 03, 2024

    Royal Mail Faces £878.5M Mass Claim Over Bulk Deliveries

    The owner of Royal Mail is facing an estimated £878.5 million ($1.1 billion) collective action, as the representative of potentially 290,000 retail businesses asked the U.K.'s specialist antitrust court to approve the class claim Wednesday.

  • July 03, 2024

    Ship's Cook Wins £28K For Sacking Over Hip Pain

    An employment tribunal has awarded a cook working for a Scottish ferry company over £28,000 ($35,749), ruling his employer unfairly sacked him after he developed a painful hip condition.

  • July 03, 2024

    Top UK Court To Define 'Payment' For Lawyer Fee Disputes

    The U.K.'s highest court is set to rule on the meaning of "payment" for determining when the clock starts ticking for clients to challenge solicitors' fees as part of a personal injury claim row with an English firm heard by justices on Wednesday.

  • July 03, 2024

    UralChem Owner Can't Shift EU Sanctions

    The European Union's General Court on Wednesday upheld sanctions against oligarch Dmitry Mazepin, finding he remains a leading businessperson in Russia's economy and a major owner of UralChem, one of the country's biggest mineral fertilizer manufacturers.

  • July 02, 2024

    Shelving Biz Hits Rival With Design Infringement Claim

    An Australian shelving manufacturer has sued a British rival for registered design infringement, arguing that certain shelving support bars being offered on the rival's U.K. website copy significant features of its intellectual property without consent.

  • July 02, 2024

    Gambling Biz Settles €273M Buyout Dispute With Financier

    Gambling hall operator MaxBet has settled a host of international legal disputes with Luxembourg-based financial holdings company Maximus stemming from a deal for Maximus to purchase various MaxBet-owned businesses that went south, lawyers for MaxBet told Law360 on Tuesday.

  • July 02, 2024

    Construction Boss' Choice To Cut His Salary Kills Benefits Bid

    A director has failed to sway an employment tribunal that he was an employee of a now-defunct construction company, because his decision to cut his salary meant he wasn't earning enough to qualify as one.

  • July 02, 2024

    £8.5M Property Deal Said To Defraud Creditors In Debt Row

    A British Virgin Islands-registered company has asked a London court to declare that the transfer of an estimated £8.5 million ($10.8 million) property by one of its debtors was done to intentionally hinder the company's chances to reclaim the money it is allegedly owed.

  • July 02, 2024

    Worldpay Faces Demand For Client Info In Alleged FX Fraud

    An architecture firm has asked a London court to order merchant service provider Worldpay to hand over a virtual ledger of one of its customer's accounts in an attempt to track down $1.17 million allegedly missing in a forex broker fraud.

  • July 02, 2024

    Barristers Fight For Fees Stemming From Adjourned Trial

    Two barristers on Tuesday urged a London appellate court to overturn a ruling that they were not entitled to the majority of approximately £150,000 ($190,140) in fees that a client had agreed to pay because the £20 million trial at which they were due to represent her was adjourned.

  • July 02, 2024

    Rolls-Royce, BMW Sue Parts Designer Over IP

    Rolls-Royce and BMW have accused a U.K. platform that sells bespoke car parts of infringing their trademarks by using their iconic logos without consent and misleading consumers.

  • July 02, 2024

    Ex-Bird & Bird Pro Fights To Toss Sexual Misconduct Case

    A former Bird & Bird LLP partner asked the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal on Tuesday to throw out allegations of sexual misconduct toward two junior female colleagues, arguing that the sector's watchdog was prosecuting him after "egregious" delays and an "inadequate" investigation.

  • July 02, 2024

    Toy Maker Sues Aldi Over Copycat Cuddly Teddy Dragon

    A manufacturer of collectible cuddly toys has accused Aldi of selling a rip-off of its dragon teddy design in its stores in Britain.

Expert Analysis

  • Lessons On Using 3rd-Party Disclosure Orders In Fraud Cases

    Author Photo

    The expansion of the gateway for service out of jurisdiction regarding third-party information orders has proven to be an effective tool against fraud since it was introduced in 2022, and recent case law offers practical tips on what applicants should be aware of when submitting such orders, says Rosie Wild at Cooke Young.

  • Bias Ruling Offers Guidance On Disqualifying Arbitrators

    Author Photo

    An English court's recent decision in H1 v. W, removing an arbitrator due to bias concerns, reaffirms practical considerations when assessing an arbitrator's impartiality, and highlights how ill-chosen language by an arbitrator can clear the high bar for disqualification, say Andrew Connelly and Ian Meredith at K&L Gates.

  • Employer Lessons From Ruling On Prof's Anti-Zionist Views

    Author Photo

    In Miller v. University of Bristol, an employment tribunal recently ruled that a professor's anti-Zionist beliefs were protected by the Equality Act 2010, highlighting for employers why it’s important to carefully consider disciplinary actions related to an employee's political expressions, says Hina Belitz at Excello Law.

  • Design Rights Can Build IP Protection, EU Lego Ruling Shows

    Author Photo

    The EU General Court's recent ruling in Delta Sport v. EU Intellectual Property Office — that Lego's registered community design for a building block was valid — helps clarify when technically dictated designs can enjoy IP protection, and demonstrates how companies can strategically use design rights to protect and enhance their market position, says Christoph Moeller at Mewburn Ellis.

  • ECJ Ruling Clarifies Lawyer Independence Questions

    Author Photo

    The European Court of Justice's recent ruling in Bonnanwalt v. EU Intellectual Property Office, finding that a law firm had maintained independence despite being owned by its client, serves as a pivotal reference point to understanding the contours of legal representation before EU courts, say James Tumbridge and Benedict Sharrock-Harris at Venner Shipley.

  • Unpacking The Law Commission's Digital Assets Consultation

    Author Photo

    The Law Commission recently published a consultation on recognizing a third personal property category to accommodate the development of digital assets, highlighting difficulties with current models of property rights and the potential consequences of considering digital assets as personal property, say Andrew Tsang and Tom Bacon at BCLP.

  • 1st Appellate Ruling On Digital Terms Sets Tone For Disputes

    Author Photo

    The Court of Appeal's recent ruling in Parker-Grennan v. Camelot, the first appellate decision to consider how online terms and conditions are publicized, provides, in its tone and verdict on incorporation, an invaluable guide for how to approach similar disputes in the digital space, says Eddy Eccles at Covington.

  • Insurance Policy Takeaways From UK Lockdown Loss Ruling

    Author Photo

    An English court's recent decision in Unipolsai v. Covea, determining that insurers' losses from COVID-19 lockdowns were covered by reinsurance, highlights key issues on insurance policy wordings, including how to define a "catastrophe" in the context of the pandemic, says Daniel Healy at Brown Rudnick.

  • How Employers Should Respond To Flexible Work Requests

    Author Photo

    U.K. employees will soon have the right to request flexible working arrangements from the first day of employment, including for religious observances, and refusing them without objective justification could expose employers to indirect discrimination claims and hurt companies’ diversity and inclusion efforts, says Jim Moore at Hamilton Nash.

  • What COVID Payout Ruling Means For Lockdown Loss Claims

    Author Photo

    While the High Court's recent COVID-19 payout decision in Gatwick v. Liberty Mutual, holding that pandemic-related regulations trigger prevention of access clauses, will likely lead to insurers accepting more business interruption claims, there are still evidentiary challenges and issues regarding policy limits and furlough, say Josianne El Antoury and Greg Lascelles at Covington.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

    Author Photo

    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • Opinion

    PACCAR Should Be 1st Step To Regulating Litigation Funders

    Author Photo

    Rather than reversing the U.K. Supreme Court's well-reasoned judgment in PACCAR v. Competition Appeal Tribunal, imposing a regulatory regime on litigation funders in parity with that of lawyers, legislators should build upon it to create a more transparent, competitive and fairer funding industry, says Rosa Curling at Foxglove.

  • Patent Plausibility Uncertainty Persists, EPO Petition Shows

    Author Photo

    While a recent petition for review at the European Patent Office — maintaining that the Board of Appeal misapplied the Enlarged Board of Appeal's order on whether a patent is "plausible" — highlights the continued uncertainty surrounding the plausibility concept, the outcome could provide useful guidance on the interpretation of orders, say lawyers at Finnegan.

  • In Int'l Arbitration Agreements, Be Clear About Governing Law

    Author Photo

    A trilogy of recent cases in the English High Court and Court of Appeal highlight the importance of parties agreeing to explicit choice of law language at the outset of an arbitration agreement in order to avoid costly legal skirmishes down the road, say lawyers at Faegre Drinker.

  • Risks The Judiciary Needs To Be Aware Of When Using AI

    Author Photo

    Recently published judiciary service guidance aims to temper reliance on AI by court staff in their work, and with ever-increasing and evolving technology, such tools should be used for supplementary assistance rather than as a replacement for already existing judicial research tools, says Philip Sewell at Shepherd & Wedderburn.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Commercial Litigation UK archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!