Connecticut

  • July 12, 2024

    Law360 Names 2024's Top Attorneys Under 40

    Law360 is pleased to announce the Rising Stars of 2024, our list of 158 attorneys under 40 whose legal accomplishments belie their age.

  • July 12, 2024

    Engineering Firms Ink $26.5M Deals To End 'No-Poach' Claims

    Four engineering firms have agreed to shell out a total of $26.5 million, while a fifth has pledged to cooperate, to settle a proposed class action alleging they conspired to restrict hiring through "no-poach" agreements, leaving RTX Corp. unit Pratt & Whitney as the sole defendant, plaintiffs told a Connecticut federal judge on Friday.

  • July 12, 2024

    AI Drugmaker BioXcel Beats Investor Fraud Suit, For Now

    A Connecticut federal judge has tossed a proposed securities fraud class action against BioXcel Therapeutics Inc., saying that while shareholders sufficiently alleged the AI-driven drugmaker made misleading statements concerning a dementia drug study's compliance issues, they failed to adequately plead the company intended to deceive or defraud investors.

  • July 12, 2024

    Conn. Health Staffing Co. Co-Owner Drops Partnership Suit

    The co-owner of a Connecticut healthcare staffing company has withdrawn a lawsuit against a co-owner accused of plundering from the partnership, a move that leaves untested a sole dissolution claim left standing by a judge who dismissed all other causes of action between the parties earlier this year.

  • July 12, 2024

    Conn. Justices Avoid Entanglement Issues In Rabbi Land Row

    The Connecticut Supreme Court on Friday agreed that a property dispute between the Chabad Lubavitch of Western and Southern New England Inc. and a Stamford rabbi belongs before a private religious panel, settling the case on arbitration principles and declining to analyze broader entanglement questions.

  • July 12, 2024

    Guo Trial Juror Booted For Googling Fugitive Co-Defendant

    The jury in Chinese dissident Miles Guo's $1 billion fraud and racketeering case was forced to restart its verdict deliberations on Friday after a juror was cut loose for Google-searching Guo's fugitive financial adviser and co-defendant William Je.

  • July 12, 2024

    Conn. Justices Say Town Can Tax Hospital's Property

    Personal property of a Connecticut hospital owned by Hartford HealthCare is taxable, the state Supreme Court said Friday, reversing a trial court opinion and ruling that Hartford's acquisition of the hospital negated a tax exemption for charitable entities.

  • July 12, 2024

    Real Estate Recap: Mall Makeovers, Military Land, Fundraising

    Catch up on this week's key developments by state from Law360 Real Estate Authority, including one Big Four retail leader's take on mall potential, the U.S. Treasury's increasing scrutiny of land deals with national security concerns, and a midyear look at private real estate fundraising trends.

  • July 12, 2024

    More Attys Leave Suit Over WWE Fan's Fla. Fireworks Injuries

    A boutique law firm that describes itself on its website as a "one stop shop" for the fireworks industry has stopped representing World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. in a fan suit alleging injuries from a fireworks display at a WWE event, saying the attorney-client relationship "has deteriorated."

  • July 12, 2024

    2nd Circ. Rejects Electronics Co.'s COVID $100M Loss Appeal

    A manufacturer of electronics components cannot continue to seek coverage for the over $100 million in losses it said it suffered because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Second Circuit ruled Friday, agreeing with a Connecticut federal court that any attempt by the manufacturer to amend its claims would be futile.

  • July 12, 2024

    Altice Says Conn. AG's 'Enhancement Fee' Suit Needs Details

    Altice USA is asking for a more specific complaint in the state of Connecticut's illegal-fee lawsuit against the cable company, telling a state judge that the initial nine-page complaint is too vague to understand or respond to.

  • July 12, 2024

    Conn. Landlord Loses COVID-Era Lease Fight With Eatery

    A Connecticut landlord did not tender an "unequivocal ultimatum" booting an eatery from a parcel of property, an appellate panel ruled Friday, finding that since the landlord vacillated between kicking the tenant off its Wallingford land and accepting payments, a 2020 eviction notice had no effect.

  • July 12, 2024

    Conn.'s Child Advocate Departs For Top Role At Nonprofit

    The attorney who led Connecticut's Office of the Child Advocate for more than a decade is stepping down this fall to return to a legal nonprofit as its executive director.

  • July 11, 2024

    2nd Circ. Backs Disbarred Atty's Prison Term For Fraud Plea

    A disbarred California attorney can't reverse a Manhattan federal court's 5½-year prison sentence and $5.5 million restitution order that followed his guilty plea to wire fraud for a real estate and venture fraud scheme, the Second Circuit ruled Thursday.

  • July 11, 2024

    NFL Arbitration Clause Is Still No Good, Flores Tells 2nd Circ.

    Former Miami Dolphins head coach Brian Flores implored the Second Circuit to keep his racial discrimination suit against the NFL out of arbitration Thursday, telling the court that the closed-door process is "highly oppressive" and tramples over federal law.

  • July 11, 2024

    Security Manager Gave $85M Biz Book To Rival Co., Suit Says

    A former Connecticut regional manager spent days downloading "extensive" data before leaving a security firm for a direct competitor, then gave his new employer millions of dollars' worth of stolen secrets to snipe clients and bolster his chances for earning a lucrative bonus, according to a new suit filed in federal court.

  • July 11, 2024

    $435M Yale Hospital Merger Case Set For December Jury Trial

    A lawsuit claiming that Yale New Haven Health Corp. is trying to back out of a $435 million deal to buy three Connecticut hospitals will go to a bench trial in December after a state court judge approved the parties' proposed schedule.

  • July 11, 2024

    Frontier Communications Fined $2.5M Over Quality Standards

    Connecticut's utility regulator has ordered Frontier Communications to pay nearly $2.5 million in penalties after finding that the company repeatedly violated mandates for maintenance, repair of service problems and filing reports with the state dating back to 2015.

  • July 11, 2024

    2nd Circ. Says Unreported Violence Doesn't Doom Asylum Bid

    The Second Circuit on Thursday said the Board of Immigration Appeals must reconsider an asylum bid from a Honduran woman claiming family abuse and rape by a criminal, finding that evidence of the difficulties women face in reporting violence and the government's ineffective response to such reports was ignored.

  • July 11, 2024

    Conn. Justices Say Law Firm's Ex Parte Sanctions Were Error

    The law firm Brignole Bush & Lewis LLC cannot be sanctioned for engaging in ex parte talks with an expert witness previously disclosed by Liberty Mutual Insurance Co., the opposing party in a car accident case, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled Thursday.

  • July 11, 2024

    Fiat Chrysler Says Exploding Minivan MDL Still Lacks Detail

    A Stellantis unit has asked a federal judge in Michigan to significantly pare back multidistrict litigation over a risk of spontaneous explosion in certain Chrysler plug-in hybrid minivans, arguing that many drivers' state claims are stale or are otherwise legally flawed.

  • July 11, 2024

    Communications Co. Says Death Suit Skirted Probate Court

    Frontier Communications of America Inc. told a Connecticut state court that it must dismiss a wrongful death case brought against it after an elderly woman fell in her basement and could not call 911 because her phone lines were down, arguing her estate skipped a vital step before filing suit.

  • July 10, 2024

    Feds Say Guo Ran 'Fraud Empire' As Racketeering Trial Wraps

    Manhattan federal prosecutors urged a jury on Wednesday to convict Chinese dissident Miles Guo for operating his political movement as a vast racketeering conspiracy that "brainwashed" supporters into spending more than $1 billion on scam investments.

  • July 10, 2024

    Snapchat Cites Federal Immunity In Conn. Sex Assault Case

    Leaning heavily on Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, Snap Inc. said Wednesday in Connecticut state court that a retooled complaint accusing it of being a co-creator or co-publisher of Bitmojis that made sexual predators look younger and less dangerous to children must fail because individual users remain in control of content published online.

  • July 10, 2024

    Ga. Eatery, Conn. Brewery End TM Fight Over Similar Names

    An Atlanta restaurant owner and the New Britain, Connecticut, brewery it accused of using effectively the same name and signage despite the Georgia businessman's trademark rights have agreed to drop their dispute in Connecticut federal court, according to a new stipulation filed by both parties.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Atty Well-Being Efforts Ignore Root Causes Of The Problem

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    The legal industry is engaged in a critical conversation about lawyers' mental health, but current attorney well-being programs primarily focus on helping lawyers cope with the stress of excessive workloads, instead of examining whether this work culture is even fundamentally compatible with lawyer well-being, says Jonathan Baum at Avenir Guild.

  • Series

    Skiing And Surfing Make Me A Better Lawyer

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    The skills I’ve learned while riding waves in the ocean and slopes in the mountains have translated to my legal career — developing strong mentor relationships, remaining calm in difficult situations, and being prepared and able to move to a backup plan when needed, says Brian Claassen at Knobbe Martens.

  • Unpacking The Circuit Split Over A Federal Atty Fee Rule

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    Federal circuit courts that have addressed Rule 41(d) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure are split as to whether attorney fees are included as part of the costs of a previously dismissed action, so practitioners aiming to recover or avoid fees should tailor arguments to the appropriate court, says Joseph Myles and Lionel Lavenue at Finnegan.

  • Fair Use Doctrine Faces Challenges In The Generative AI Era

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    As courts struggle to apply existing copyright principles to new, digital contexts, the evolving capabilities of AI technologies are testing the limits of traditional frameworks, with the fair use doctrine being met with significant challenges, says John Poulos at Norton Rose.

  • Lower Courts May Finally Be Getting The Memo After Ciminelli

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    A year after the U.S. Supreme Court again limited prosecutors' overbroad theories of fraud in Ciminelli v. U.S., early returns suggest that the message has at least partially landed with the lower courts, spotlighting lessons for defense counsel moving forward, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • After A Brief Hiccup, The 'Rocket Docket' Soars Back To No. 1

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    The Eastern District of Virginia’s precipitous 2022 fall from its storied rocket docket status appears to have been a temporary aberration, as recent statistics reveal that the court is once again back on top as the fastest federal civil trial court in the nation, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • Recruitment Trends In Emerging Law Firm Frontiers

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    BigLaw firms are facing local recruitment challenges as they increasingly establish offices in cities outside of the major legal hubs, requiring them to weigh various strategies for attracting talent that present different risks and benefits, says Tom Hanlon at Buchanan Law.

  • Series

    Glassblowing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    I never expected that glassblowing would strongly influence my work as an attorney, but it has taught me the importance of building a solid foundation for your work, learning from others and committing to a lifetime of practice, says Margaret House at Kalijarvi Chuzi.

  • How Associates Can Build A Professional Image

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    As hybrid work arrangements become the norm in the legal industry, early-career attorneys must be proactive in building and maintaining a professional presence in both physical and digital settings, ensuring that their image aligns with their long-term career goals, say Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners and Estelle Winsett at Estelle Winsett Professional Image Consulting.

  • 5 Steps To Navigating State Laws On Healthcare Transactions

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    As more states pass legislation requiring healthcare-transaction notice, private equity investors and other deal parties should evaluate the new laws and consider ways to mitigate their effects, say Carol Loepere and Nicole Aiken-Shaban at Reed Smith.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

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    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Politics In The Workplace: What Employers Need To Know

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    As the 2024 election approaches and protests continue across the country, employers should be aware of employees' rights — and limits on those rights — related to political speech and activities in the workplace, and be prepared to act proactively to prevent issues before they arise, say attorneys at Littler.

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