Connecticut

  • July 10, 2024

    Feds Say Guo Ran 'Fraud Empire' As Racketeering Trial Wraps

    Manhattan federal prosecutors urged a jury on Wednesday to convict Chinese dissident Miles Guo for operating his political movement as a vast racketeering conspiracy that "brainwashed" supporters into spending more than $1 billion on scam investments.

  • July 10, 2024

    Snapchat Cites Federal Immunity In Conn. Sex Assault Case

    Leaning heavily on Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, Snap Inc. said Wednesday in Connecticut state court that a retooled complaint accusing it of being a co-creator or co-publisher of Bitmojis that made sexual predators look younger and less dangerous to children must fail because individual users remain in control of content published online.

  • July 10, 2024

    Ga. Eatery, Conn. Brewery End TM Fight Over Similar Names

    An Atlanta restaurant owner and the New Britain, Connecticut, brewery it accused of using effectively the same name and signage despite the Georgia businessman's trademark rights have agreed to drop their dispute in Connecticut federal court, according to a new stipulation filed by both parties.

  • July 10, 2024

    Former Conn. Top Public Defender Claims Bias Led To Ouster

    The former chief public defender in Connecticut has filed a second action challenging her June 4 ouster for misconduct, lodging an administrative appeal in state court that claims racial bias.

  • July 10, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Rethink Arbitration Denial In ERISA Suit

    The Second Circuit declined to reconsider its May ruling that a group of financial services companies can't compel individual arbitration of a proposed class action accusing them of overcharging an employee stock ownership plan, rejecting one company's argument that the panel unfairly displayed "hostility to arbitration."

  • July 10, 2024

    Conn. Justices Told Banking Agency's Probe Overstepped

    The Connecticut Department of Banking's investigation into Commonwealth Law Group and Commonwealth Servicing Group LLC's debt negotiation practices violated the constitutional separation of powers, because only the state's judicial branch has regulatory authority over legal services provided to clients by their attorneys, the firms told the state Supreme Court.

  • July 09, 2024

    No Proof Consumers Vexed By 'Spring' Water, Court Told

    Nestle Waters North America Inc. on Tuesday urged a Connecticut federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit alleging that Poland Spring water does not emanate from an actual spring, arguing that references to spring water on product labels mean different things to different consumers and that no confusion has been proved.

  • July 09, 2024

    Indicted Ex-Conn. Official Drops Greece Vacation Plan

    Ex-Connecticut budget official Konstantinos "Kosta" Diamantis on Tuesday dropped his request for a federal judge's permission to travel to Greece while he is under indictment, withdrawing his motion one day after prosecutors objected.

  • July 09, 2024

    Purdue Plans 'High-Speed' Bid For New Ch. 11 Plan

    Purdue Pharma told a New York bankruptcy judge Tuesday that it plans a two-month "high-speed, high-stakes" attempt to replace the Chapter 11 plan shot down by the U.S. Supreme Court last month before unleashing litigation on its former owning family.

  • July 09, 2024

    2nd Circ. Urged To Toss Cannabis Dormant Commerce Suit

    New York cannabis regulators have urged the Second Circuit to disregard a California lawyer's efforts to upend the state's licensing program, arguing that the dormant commerce clause doesn't apply to marijuana, a substance that Congress has not permitted to be traded between states.

  • July 09, 2024

    Baby Bottle Makers Sued Over Claims Products Are 'BPA Free'

    Philips North America and baby product maker Mayborn USA sell baby bottles that contain "considerable amounts of harmful microplastics" despite being advertised as free of the potentially harmful plastic chemical BPA, according to a pair of suits filed in Massachusetts and Connecticut federal courts.

  • July 09, 2024

    Ex-DOJ Atty Tells Guo Jury Of Illicit Extradition Campaign

    Prominent Chinese Communist Party critic Miles Guo capped off his defense to $1 billion fraud charges Tuesday with testimony from a former U.S. Department of Justice attorney, who admitted to participating in a plot to lobby the U.S. government for Guo's extradition to China.

  • July 09, 2024

    Connecticut's Brownstone Park Fights $9M Foot Injury Award

    A Connecticut state jury's $9 million award to a man who suffered a foot injury at an outdoor adventure park is far too high, considering that his medical bills were significantly lower than that and he never missed work, defense counsel argued Tuesday in seeking a new trial or a reduced verdict.

  • July 09, 2024

    Kirkland Guides Avesi Partners To $1.35B Fund II Close

    Stamford, Connecticut-based Avesi Partners, a private equity firm specializing in healthcare and business services, said Tuesday it had closed Avesi Partners Fund II LP at $1.35 billion, with Kirkland & Ellis LLP serving as legal counsel to the oversubscribed fund. 

  • July 08, 2024

    Shopify Privacy Ruling Threatens AGs' Work, 9th Circ. Told

    Attorneys general from 30 states and the District of Columbia, along with a trio of California city attorneys, are calling on the Ninth Circuit to revive a proposed class action accusing payment processing company Shopify of collecting shoppers' sensitive information without permission, arguing that the dispute threatens to deprive them of their ability to enforce their states' consumer protection laws. 

  • July 08, 2024

    2nd Circ. Lets Rail Co. Retool Suit Against Big Banks

    The Second Circuit on Monday restored Eddystone Rail Co. LLC's lawsuit targeting Bank of America NA and other banks for their alleged roles helping an oil transportation and logistics company evade liability in a roughly $140 million contract dispute, reasoning that the rail company still has time to amend its complaint.

  • July 08, 2024

    Purdue Creditors Look To Sue Sacklers After Justices' Ruling

    The official committee of unsecured creditors in the Chapter 11 case of drugmaker Purdue Pharma asked a New York bankruptcy judge on Monday for standing to bring actions against members of the Sackler family that own the company after the U.S. Supreme Court torpedoed a precarious settlement among the parties.

  • July 08, 2024

    Full 2nd Circ. Urged To 'Correct' Panel's Insider Trading Ruling

    A hedge fund accused of taking advantage of its corporate insider status to profit off swing trading in 1-800-Flowers' stock is urging the full bench of the Second Circuit to reconsider a decision to revive the lawsuit against it, arguing in a Monday petition to the court that the ruling clashes with both U.S. Supreme Court precedent and with controlling Second Circuit precedent on standing. 

  • July 08, 2024

    Conn. Asset Manager Offers Grayscale $2M Out For Ad Suit

    A Fairfield, Connecticut-based asset management firm that accused Grayscale Investments LLC of falsely advertising its services in order to lure investors informed the company and the Constitution State court hearing its lawsuit that it would be willing to settle the matter for a just below $2 million payment.

  • July 08, 2024

    Anesthesia Death Trial Ends In $15.4M Award For Estate

    A Connecticut anesthesiology group must pay $15.4 million to the estate of a 57-year-old woman who suffered cardiorespiratory collapse and severe brain damage during a routine 20-minute outpatient gastroenterology imaging procedure and died a month later in an intensive care unit, a state superior court jury has decided.

  • July 08, 2024

    HR Chief Says Conn. City Cut Pay Without Explanation

    Officials in the city of Derby, Connecticut, flouted the municipal human resources director's contractual and constitutional rights when they reduced her annual compensation in March without explanation, according to a lawsuit in federal court.

  • July 08, 2024

    Yale Hospital Earmarks $411M For Possible Judgment

    Yale New Haven Health Services Corp. has agreed to set aside $411.5 million to satisfy a potential judgment against it in an ongoing dispute over its soured $435 million deal to buy three Connecticut facilities run by Prospect Medical Holdings Inc., according to a stipulation from the parties.

  • July 05, 2024

    Conn. Firm Sued For Repping Both Parties In Business Sale

    A Connecticut law firm has been hit with a malpractice suit saying an attorney improperly represented both parties in the sale of an interest in a restaurant business and ultimately drafted an agreement that misstated the deal in favor of the seller, leading to a $750,000 claim against the buyer.

  • July 05, 2024

    Real Estate Recap: Post-Chevron, Lawyer Leaps, Q&A Recap

    Catch up on this past week's key developments by state from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including policy areas to watch in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's paradigm-shifting Chevron ruling, recent real estate lawyer moves and some insightful conversations with real estate lawyers you may have missed.

  • July 05, 2024

    Fired Atty Only Gets $9K From $1.5M Motorcycle Crash Deal

    A Connecticut appeals court ruled Friday that $9,000 was a fair payment to a personal injury attorney who was fired after he quickly obtained a $100,000 settlement offer for a motorcyclist who eventually settled for $1.5 million.

Expert Analysis

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Shows Lies Must Go To Nature Of Bargain

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Milheiser decision, vacating six mail fraud convictions, clarifies that the key question in federal fraud cases is not whether lies were told, but what they were told about — thus requiring defense counsel to rethink their strategies, say Charles Kreindler and Krista Landis at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Live Nation May Shake It Off In A Long Game With The DOJ

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    Don't expect a swift resolution in the U.S. Department of Justice's case against Live Nation, but a long litigation, with the company likely to represent itself as the creator of a competitive ecosystem, and the government faced with explaining how the ticketing giant formed under its watch, say Thomas Kliebhan and Taylor Hixon at GRSM50.

  • How Federal And State Microfiber Pollution Policy Is Evolving

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    Growing efforts to address synthetic microfiber pollution may create compliance and litigation issues for businesses in the textile and apparel industries, so companies should track developing federal and state legislation and regulation in this space, and should consider associated greenwashing risks, says Arie Feltman-Frank at Jenner & Block.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • What Junk Fee Law Means For Biz In California And Beyond

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    Come July 1, companies doing business in California must ensure that the price of any good or service as offered, displayed or advertised is inclusive of all mandatory fees and other charges in compliance with S.B. 478, which may have a far-reaching impact across the country due to wide applicability, say Alexandria Ruiz and Amy Lally at Sidley Austin.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

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    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

  • Perspectives

    Trauma-Informed Legal Approaches For Pro Bono Attorneys

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    As National Trauma Awareness Month ends, pro bono attorneys should nevertheless continue to acknowledge the mental and physical effects of trauma, allowing them to better represent clients, and protect themselves from compassion fatigue and burnout, say Katherine Cronin at Stinson and Katharine Manning at Blackbird.

  • Series

    Playing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My deep and passionate involvement in playing, writing and producing music equipped me with skills — like creativity, improvisation and problem-solving — that contribute to the success of my legal career, says attorney Kenneth Greene.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Pitfalls When Withdrawing From A Case

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    The Trump campaign's recent scuffle over its bid to replace its counsel in a pregnancy retaliation suit offers a chance to remind attorneys that many troubles inherent in withdrawing from a case can be mitigated or entirely avoided by communicating with clients openly and frequently, says Christopher Konneker at Orsinger Nelson.

  • Using A Children's Book Approach In Firm Marketing Content

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    From “The Giving Tree” to “Where the Wild Things Are,” most children’s books are easy to remember because they use simple words and numbers to tell stories with a human impact — a formula law firms should emulate in their marketing content to stay front of mind for potential clients, says Seema Desai Maglio at The Found Word.

  • The State Of Play In DEI And ESG 1 Year After Harvard Ruling

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    Almost a year after the U.S. Supreme Court decided Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard, attorney general scrutiny of environmental, social and governance-related efforts indicates a potential path for corporate diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives to be targeted, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Affirms NY Law's Creditor-Friendly Approach

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    The Second Circuit’s recent ruling in 245 Park Member v. HNA International provides creditors with some reason for optimism that debtors in New York may face rejection in court for aiming to keep creditors at arm’s length by transferring personal assets into an LLC, says Jeff Newton at Omni Bridgeway.

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