Connecticut

  • June 10, 2024

    Snap Slams Connecticut Girl's Renewed Sex Assault Suit

    A renewed lawsuit alleging that Snapchat's Bitmoji avatars make it easier for sexual predators and other malicious individuals to groom minors must be dismissed again, Snap Inc. told a Connecticut state court, because the new complaint retreads the same allegations the court already tossed out.

  • June 07, 2024

    Conn. Judge Pushes State For Proof In $11M Kickback Case

    The Connecticut state judge presiding over an $11 million false claims and kickbacks case against a compounding pharmacy appeared unconvinced Friday that the defendants submitted false claims for payment, peppering the government's counsel with requests to support assertions with case law and evidence that was put on at trial.

  • June 07, 2024

    7 Health Insurers Eye Rate Hikes In Connecticut

    Seven health insurers have asked Connecticut state regulators to approve rate hikes of 7.4% to 12.5% for individual market plans and 5.1% to 13.6% for small groups, averaging out to a lesser increase than last year's, according to an announcement Friday.

  • June 07, 2024

    Connecticut Man Ran Illegal $1M Crypto Exchange, Feds Say

    A 55-year-old Connecticut man is accused of ignoring warnings and operating an unlicensed exchange that charged fees for converting more than $1 million in cash, checks and money orders into cryptocurrency without a required license from the state banking commissioner, federal prosecutors announced Friday.

  • June 07, 2024

    Yale Hospital Sued For Seeking To Exit $435M Purchase Deal

    California-based Prospect Medical Holdings Inc. has sued Yale New Haven Health for seeking to back out of a $435 million acquisition of three financially distressed Connecticut hospitals, accusing the state's largest hospital of breach of contract and wrongfully leaking a prior lawsuit to the press.

  • June 07, 2024

    COVID Test Supplier Sees $1.4M Default Loss In Gopuff Suit

    A Connecticut federal court on Friday handed a medical supply company a default loss in a suit by online retail delivery service Gopuff alleging that the supplier failed to fulfill an order for nearly 106,000 COVID-19 test kits, ordering the company to pay roughly $1.4 million.

  • June 06, 2024

    3 Takeaways From Probe That Halted WWE Staffer's Suit

    The pause of a former World Wrestling Entertainment legal staffer's sex-trafficking lawsuit amid a probe by New York federal prosecutors suggests the civil claims could be the basis of forthcoming criminal charges for co-founder Vince McMahon or the organization, or both.

  • June 06, 2024

    'Brothel' Manager Violated Bail After $5.7M Sting, Feds Say

    A manager and bookkeeper facing federal charges connected to a COVID-19 grant and tax fraud scheme at a Connecticut strip club violated his bail conditions by showing up at the facility and "hanging out" with a potential witness, federal probation authorities have alleged.

  • June 06, 2024

    Kwok's 'Whole Movement Is A Scam,' Ex-Fundraiser Tells Jury

    A former top deputy in exiled Chinese billionaire Ho Wan Kwok's anti-Chinese Communist Party movement testified in Manhattan federal court this week that she raised millions of investor dollars out of a deep belief in the cause, but has since realized the entire enterprise was a "scam."

  • June 06, 2024

    Conn. US Atty's Office Looks Within To Fill Leadership Roles

    U.S. Attorney Vanessa Roberts Avery made new supervisory appointments within the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Connecticut and its Criminal Division, including the second-ranking position within the office.

  • June 06, 2024

    Alex Jones Abandons Ch. 11 Reorg Plan, Moves To Liquidate

    Right-wing radio host Alex Jones asked a Texas bankruptcy court to convert his bankruptcy case to a Chapter 7 liquidation, abandoning his proposed plan to reorganize his personal debts in the face of more than $1 billion in defamation claims from the families of Sandy Hook school shooting victims.

  • June 05, 2024

    Adviser Can't Unfreeze Assets To Pay Atty Fees

    A Connecticut federal judge is standing by his earlier decision refusing to release $50,000 in frozen assets to pay the attorneys of an investment adviser and his wife, who face a $5.9 million fraud suit from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • June 05, 2024

    VA Asks To Appeal Refusal To Toss Systemic Discrimination Suit

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs wants a Connecticut federal judge to green light an immediate appeal of his decision declining to dismiss systemic discrimination claims by a Black Marine Corps veteran, saying the Federal Tort Claims Act is an improper route for relief.

  • June 05, 2024

    Sierra Club Touts Offshore Wind Cost Savings In New England

    The Sierra Club is heralding offshore wind investment as critical to achieving New England's climate goals, slashing energy costs and protecting residents from volatile natural gas prices, citing a new report it commissioned that Synapse Energy Economics Inc. authored.

  • June 05, 2024

    Attys Get Third Of $1.4M Webster Bank Breach Deal

    A New Jersey federal judge on Wednesday granted final approval to a $1.4 million settlement, including $476,000 in fees for class counsel, in a suit from a class of account holders that sought to hold Webster Bank and its fraud detection services provider liable for a ransomware attack.

  • June 05, 2024

    $900K Injury Verdict Sparks Fee Squabble In Connecticut

    Connecticut law firm Ventura and Ribeiro LLP is taking Perkins and Associates PC to state court over the legal fees from a $900,000 personal injury case settlement that both firms worked on, claiming that Perkins is trying to take too much of the pie.

  • June 04, 2024

    Insulin Pens Exposed Patients To Disease, Hospital Says

    A Connecticut-based hospital says medical device manufacturer Novo Nordisk should be on the hook for a $1 million settlement the hospital paid to end claims that patients were exposed to blood-borne infections because of the medical staff's use of Novo Nordisk's product.

  • June 04, 2024

    'Ghost Gun' Makers Ask 2nd Circ. To Weigh In On NY AG Case

    A group of companies being sued by the New York attorney general over their distribution of so-called ghost gun kits is asking the Second Circuit to weigh in on the case and decide whether the parts kits can be considered "firearms" and if they are entitled to immunity under federal firearms law.

  • June 04, 2024

    Zantac Suits Belong In Conn. State Court, Cancer Patients Say

    Lawsuits claiming Zantac and its generic equivalents caused cancer belong in Connecticut state court, two groups of Constitution State cancer patients and their estates say, arguing against several drugmakers' assertions that they can't be sued in the state on innovator and warning label liability claims.

  • June 04, 2024

    2nd Circ. Says ERISA Blocks Cigna Bill Backpedaling Suit

    The Second Circuit affirmed the dismissal of a podiatric medicine provider's suit alleging Cigna illegally backtracked on covering a patient's $200,000 bill, ruling that a lower court was right to find that federal benefits law blocks the healthcare provider's breach of contract claims.

  • June 04, 2024

    'Miles Guo Stole My Money': NY Jury Hears Of Alleged Fraud

    A former supporter of exiled Chinese billionaire Miles Guo testified in Manhattan federal court Tuesday that the purported billionaire conned her into investing more than $100,000 in the media company he founded alongside former Donald Trump adviser Steve Bannon, describing Guo's interrelated business ventures as a "mafia."

  • June 04, 2024

    2nd Circ. Backs TD Bank's Win Over Ex-Manager's Bias Suit

    The Second Circuit refused Tuesday to revive a former TD Bank manager's suit claiming he was fired because he suffered from anxiety and had requested parental leave, finding he couldn't overcome the bank's explanation that he was let go because of forgery.

  • June 04, 2024

    Conn. Judicial Marshal Charged With Workers' Comp Fraud

    A judicial marshal for the Connecticut Judicial Branch has been arrested and charged with trying to steal $891.52 in workers' compensation benefits after he was injured while trying to restrain a prisoner, prosecutors said.

  • June 03, 2024

    Sandy Hook Families Seek To Liquidate Alex Jones' Media Co.

    Creditors of right-wing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones' media company Free Speech Systems have asked a Texas bankruptcy judge to convert its Chapter 11 to a Chapter 7, saying liquidation is the only realistic route for creditors to get paid as the separate bankruptcies of the InfoWars parent and Jones near their close.

  • June 03, 2024

    Drug Cos. Can Depose DC AG In Drug Price-Fixing Row

    A Connecticut federal judge reluctantly ordered the District of Columbia Attorney General's Office to be deposed by the drug companies wrapped up in more than 40 states' claims over an alleged price-fixing conspiracy, noting that he would not have done so but for the case being remanded from a sprawling multidistrict litigation in Pennsylvania.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Ex-OpenSea Staffer Case May Clarify When Info Is Property

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    In considering the appeal of a former OpenSea manager’s wire fraud conviction in U.S. v. Chastain, the Second Circuit may soon provide guidance about whether economic information is traditional property in certain insider trading prosecutions — a theory of fraud that the U.S. Supreme Court has repeatedly narrowed, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • How 4 State AGs Are Shaping Data Privacy Compliance

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    As the landscape of state data privacy laws continues to grow across the nation, understanding how state attorneys general — such as in California, Colorado, Connecticut and Virginia — are thinking about these laws is critical to begin forecasting how enforcement will play out, say Michelle Kallen and Daniel Echeverri at Jenner & Block.

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