Construction

  • July 05, 2024

    Judge Rips High-Rise's 'Remarkable' $8.5M Coverage Pursuit

    An Illinois federal judge smacked down an $8.5 million coverage bid from the former owners of Chicago's historic Pittsfield building after finding they "boldly and repeatedly" misrepresented the extent of repair costs, instead ordering them to repay Travelers.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Firms That Won Big At The Supreme Court

    This U.S. Supreme Court term featured high-stakes oral arguments on issues including gerrymandering, abortion and federal agency authority, and a hot bench ever more willing to engage in a lengthy back-and-forth with advocates. Here's a look at the law firms that argued the most cases and how they fared.

  • July 05, 2024

    Unilateral Climate Policies Threaten Trade, WTO Deputy Says

    Touting a new trade agreement between Costa Rica, Iceland, New Zealand and Switzerland, a World Trade Organization deputy director-general said the multilateral system is at a crossroads where more countries must work together to address the link between trade and climate change or risk harming progress on both fronts.

  • July 03, 2024

    Alaskan Tribe Says It Can't Get Access To Burial Site

    The governing body of an Alaska Native Tribe is suing several state entities and the Federal Aviation Administration, claiming they are preventing the tribe from performing excavations of archaeological artifacts and ancestral remains found during construction of an airport runway.

  • July 03, 2024

    Vietnam Wood Circumvention Duties Are Sound, Feds Say

    The U.S. Department of Commerce urged the U.S. Court of International Trade to uphold its circumvention duties on Vietnamese plywood found to contain materials from China, saying that importers and producers failed to provide timely evidence disproving the allegations, despite having ample opportunity.

  • July 03, 2024

    Sandy Cleanup Workers Agree To End Prevailing Wage Suit

    Five workers told a New Jersey federal judge they agreed to put to rest their suit against a disaster recovery company and a waterfront building company claiming they should have been paid prevailing wages while clearing roadways and waterways in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.

  • July 03, 2024

    Assa Abloy Trying To Rewrite Merger Deal, Gov't Claims

    The U.S. Department of Justice fired back at Assa Abloy's bid to rein in a monitoring trustee installed after the company settled a government merger challenge, saying the company is trying to "walk away from its promises to the court" after completing its acquisition of Spectrum Brands' hardware and home improvement business.

  • July 03, 2024

    Developer Owes $10M For Boston Project Delays, Suit Says

    Massachusetts contractor Suffolk Construction Co. Inc. claims the developer of a significant mixed-use residential and commercial block in Boston's South End still owes it more than $10 million, saying delays due to the pandemic and a change in the type of cabinetry in the apartments contributed to higher costs.

  • July 03, 2024

    Turf Co. Wants Out Of Rival's Trade Secrets Suit

    Facing allegations from a major artificial turf manufacturer that it poached one of its executives and trade secrets, a rival turf company hit back Tuesday by claiming that it has "no idea what information might be encompassed" by allegedly stolen files, and thus, the suit must be dismissed.

  • July 02, 2024

    Texas Rebar Giant Can't Toss Calif. Rival's Antitrust Claims

    A California federal judge denied a bid by rebar giant Commercial Metals Co. seeking to ditch a California rival's antitrust suit accusing the Texas-based company of inhibiting competition and driving up prices for the construction mainstay, saying there are disputes in the case that need to go before a jury.

  • July 02, 2024

    Debevoise Can't Avoid Testifying In Ex-Cognizant Execs' Trial

    A New Jersey federal judge denied Tuesday a bid by Debevoise & Plimpton LLP to quash a subpoena seeking testimony from a firm partner for the coming bribery trial of two former Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp. executives.

  • July 02, 2024

    Conn. Justices Send Trade Secrets Row Back To Trial Court

    The Connecticut Supreme Court ordered a "limited" new trial Tuesday in a trade secrets case that pit Dur-A-Flex Inc. against numerous companies tied to research chemist Samet Dy, its former employee, finding error in the lower court's rulings on issues including damages and the enforceability of Dy's noncompete agreement.

  • July 02, 2024

    Turkish Co. Says Feds Mistook Tax Exemptions For Subsidies

    A Turkish steel company challenged new countervailing duties on steel concrete rebar, telling the U.S. Court of International Trade that the federal government allegedly misidentified a widely available tax exemption as a subsidy providing an unfair market advantage.

  • July 02, 2024

    Flint Needs State Help After Years Of Pipe Delays, Judge Says

    A Michigan federal judge said the city of Flint's repeated failures to replace lead water service lines for residents shows it doesn't have the "wherewithal" or funds to finish the project and granted yet another extension to complete the work with offered help from the state of Michigan.

  • July 02, 2024

    Dentons Says Ex-Client Can't Escape $4.7M Fee Suit In Texas

    International law firm Dentons Europe CS LLP urged a Texas federal court Tuesday to keep alive its suit accusing a Houston-area crisis response business of failing to pay more than $4.7 million in legal fees and said the correct venue was Texas, not England, as the business has argued.

  • July 02, 2024

    The Commercial Real Estate Q&A's You Can't Miss

    Check out Law360 Real Estate Authority's most buzzed-about commercial real estate Q&As from the first half of 2024.

  • July 02, 2024

    Alaska Village Hits Army Corps With Gold Mine Permit Suit

    The Native Village of Dot Lake is asking an Alaska federal judge to throw out a permit the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued for an open pit gold mine Kinross Gold Corp. and Peak Gold LLC are developing near the Yukon border.

  • July 02, 2024

    Dentons Adds Ex-Seyfarth Int'l Disputes Co-Chair In DC

    Dentons has hired the former co-chair of Seyfarth Shaw LLP's international disputes resolution group, who joins the firm's Washington, D.C., office to help clients on engineering, construction and development project matters, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • July 02, 2024

    The Residential Real Estate Q&A's You Can't Miss

    Check out Law360 Real Estate Authority's hottest residential real estate Q&A's from the first half of 2024.

  • July 02, 2024

    Thomas Laments Cert Denial In OSHA Standard Setting Fight

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Tuesday it will not review the Sixth Circuit's split decision that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's authority to set workplace safety standards is constitutional, although Justice Clarence Thomas warned against the "far-reaching" grant of that power to an agency.

  • July 01, 2024

    Guatemala Says $31M Award Can't Be Enforced In U.S.

    Guatemala told a D.C. federal court on Friday that litigation filed by a construction and engineering firm to enforce $31 million in arbitral awards against it must be tossed, saying the underlying arbitration and dispute are entirely Guatemalan in nature.

  • July 01, 2024

    Philly Developer's Co. Must Pay $68.5M Over Worker's Death

    The family of a man who died after falling 50 feet from a scaffolding while installing siding on a luxury townhome has been awarded $68.5 million by a Philadelphia jury, sticking prominent city developer Ori Feibush's construction company with a hefty tab.

  • July 01, 2024

    No Resolution In Sight For Trade Pact Auto Rules Dispute

    The U.S. automotive industry is weighed down by a trade dispute over treaty requirements to source locally manufactured parts and uncertainty regarding how the rules will apply to electric vehicles, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative said in a report Monday.

  • July 01, 2024

    CNX Says Employee Tried To Patent Its Tech For Himself

    CNX Resources Corp. has filed a trade secret lawsuit in Pennsylvania federal court accusing a former employee of wrongfully using the natural gas company's confidential business information to file patent applications in his own name.

  • June 28, 2024

    Chevron's End Is Just The Start For Energized Agency Foes

    By knocking down a powerful precedent that has towered over administrative law for 40 years, the U.S. Supreme Court's right wing Friday gave a crowning achievement to anti-agency attorneys. But for those attorneys, the achievement is merely a means to an end, and experts expect a litigation blitzkrieg to materialize quickly in the aftermath.

Expert Analysis

  • How Associates Can Build A Professional Image

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    As hybrid work arrangements become the norm in the legal industry, early-career attorneys must be proactive in building and maintaining a professional presence in both physical and digital settings, ensuring that their image aligns with their long-term career goals, say Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners and Estelle Winsett at Estelle Winsett Professional Image Consulting.

  • Navigating New Safe Harbor For Domestic Content Tax Credits

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    The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s recent notice simplifying domestic content calculations for certain solar, onshore wind and battery storage projects, which directly acknowledges the difficulty for taxpayers in gathering data to support a domestic content analysis, should make it easier to qualify additional domestic content bonus tax credits, say attorneys at A&O Shearman.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

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    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • How A Bumblebee Got Under Calif. Wildlife Regulator's Bonnet

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    A California bumblebee's listing as an endangered species could lead to a regulatory quagmire as California Department of Fish and Wildlife permits now routinely include survey requirements for the bee, but the regulator has yet to determine what the species needs for conservation, says David Smith at Manatt.

  • The Clock Is Ticking For Fla. Construction Defect Claims

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    Ahead of the fast-approaching July 1 deadline for filing construction defect claims in Florida, Sean Ravenel at Foran Glennon discusses how the state's new statute of repose has changed the timeline, and highlights several related issues that property owners should be aware of.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • State Procurement Could Be Key For Calif. Offshore Wind

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    A recent ruling from the California Public Utilities Commission highlights how the state's centralized electricity procurement mechanism could play a critical role in the development of long lead-time resources — in particular, offshore wind — by providing market assurance to developers and reducing utilities' procurement risks, say attorneys at Wilson Sonsini.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

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    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

  • Opinion

    US Solar Import Probe's Focus On China Is Misguided

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    The U.S. Department of Commerce's recent anti-dumping and countervailing duty investigation focuses on the apparent Chinese ownership of solar device importers in four Southeast Asian countries — a point that is irrelevant under the controlling statute, says John Anwesen at Lighthill.

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