Construction

  • June 25, 2024

    Trade Court Judge Presses Feds On Cabinet Import Findings

    A U.S. Court of International Trade judge on Monday pressed Customs and Border Protection to explain why it cleared a kitchen cabinet importer of tariff-evasion allegations despite its description of the company as a "known" transshipper.

  • June 25, 2024

    White & Case Adds King & Spalding Energy Pro In Houston

    White & Case LLP announced Tuesday that it has strengthened its global project development and finance practice, its global energy industry group and its U.S. construction practice with a partner in Houston who came aboard from King & Spalding LLP.

  • June 24, 2024

    Ex-Philly Union Head Denied Acquittal On Embezzlement

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has declined to throw out the conviction of John Dougherty, the former business manager of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98, on charges that he stole money from the union to pay for repairs to his home and others' properties.

  • June 24, 2024

    K-Pop Stars Cited As Judge Awards $171M In Rail Fraud Fight

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has awarded over $171 million to Eddystone Rail after finding Bridger Logistics affiliates liable for fraudulent asset transfers under a rail services agreement, citing the South Korean boy band BTS in his decision writing the defendants made 'Bad Decisions" and it's time they "Make It Right."

  • June 24, 2024

    Architect Wants Roofer's Claim Nixed Over $17.6M School Fires

    Connecticut architectural firm Silver Petrucelli & Associates Inc. asked a state judge on Monday to strike a cross-claim by a builder it accused of impermissably using blowtorches to attach flashing to a school roof, setting fires in December 2021 and July 2022 that caused an alleged $17.6 million in damage.

  • June 24, 2024

    Ill. Landowners Challenge FERC Moves On $7B Power Line

    Illinois residents, farmers and landowners launched a fresh challenge to the $7 billion Grain Belt Express high-voltage power line, telling the D.C. Circuit that when the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approved an amended negotiated rate authority, it ignored clean energy giant Invenergy's unsanctioned purchase of the project in 2020.

  • June 24, 2024

    Ex-Chicago Alderman Gets Two Years For Boosting Law Firm

    An Illinois federal judge on Monday sentenced former Chicago Alderman Ed Burke to two years in prison and fined him $2 million for using his official position to steer tax business to his personal law firm, closing what prosecutors called "another sordid chapter" in the city's history of public corruption.

  • June 24, 2024

    Pipe Co. Seeks Full Fed. Circ. Redo Of Thai Pipe Duty Review

    A pipe company asked the full Federal Circuit to unwind a panel ruling broadening a decades-old anti-dumping duty order on Thai pipe, saying the panel mistakenly expanded the levy to cover more imports than allowed under federal trade law.

  • June 24, 2024

    Judge Blocks Part Of DOL Construction Prevailing Wage Rule

    A Texas federal judge on Monday blocked parts of a U.S. Department of Labor rule changing how prevailing wages are determined for federally funded construction projects from going into effect, saying the department had overstepped its authority under the Davis-Bacon Act.

  • June 24, 2024

    McDermott Investors See Partial Cert. In $6B CB&I Deal Suit

    Investors in energy industry engineering company McDermott International Inc. saw part of their proposed investor class certified as a lead plaintiff is sought for a second subclass in litigation over the company's $6 billion acquisition of Chicago Bridge & Iron Company NV.

  • June 24, 2024

    NM Sued Over Sustainable Building Credit Award Process

    A New Mexico apartment complex alleges that the state violated its due process rights after it was denied sustainable building tax credits for most of its units, according to a complaint filed in federal court.

  • June 24, 2024

    Construction Super Says Name Was Secretly Used On Permits

    A unit of construction engineering firm Structural Group Inc. improperly used the name of a licensed construction supervisor on at least half a dozen Massachusetts projects in which he was not involved, according to a lawsuit filed Monday in Norfolk County Superior Court.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Objections To $2.67B BCBS Deal

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused on Monday to review Home Depot's challenge of a $2.67 billion settlement in antitrust litigation targeting Blue Cross Blue Shield, along with a separate challenge of the attorney fees awarded for the deal.

  • June 21, 2024

    Real Estate Recap: Distressed Deals, Housing Hurdles, Infill

    Catch up on this week's key state developments from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including tips for guiding distressed office deals, the latest intel from Harvard University's Joint Center for Housing Studies, and how one U.S. city has been a magnet for federal funding of brownfield projects.

  • June 21, 2024

    Insurer Targets Ex-Employee Over $47M Plant Financing Claim

    British insurance company Beazley has targeted a former employee in Florida federal court, accusing the former underwriter of exposing it to a $47 million arbitration claim in Brazil after he improperly inked a deal with a reinsurer as part of an ill-fated financing pact for a thermoelectric plant.

  • June 21, 2024

    Conn. Steel Co. Files Ch. 11 After Contractor Dispute

    A $2.29 million judgment and the sunsetting of the $7.5 million limit for a bankruptcy provision aimed at small businesses prompted a Connecticut steel company to hit Chapter 11 this week, an attorney for the debtor said at a hearing Friday.

  • June 21, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Backs Subsidy Duties For Canadian Wind Towers

    A Canadian wind tower manufacturer can't get a break on countervailing duties despite being upfront about errors in its sales data, with the Federal Circuit ruling Friday that the errors raise the possibility of additional mistakes.

  • June 21, 2024

    Tube Co. Blames Denied Duty Refund Claim On CBP Error

    A steel importer told the U.S. Court of International Trade on Friday that customs officials refused to honor a waiver for $241,000 worth of national security tariffs based on an import classification issue that they allegedly created.

  • June 21, 2024

    Ex-Chicago Alderman Burke Can't Delay Sentencing

    Former Chicago Alderman Ed Burke can't postpone his Monday sentencing on charges of racketeering, extortion and bribery to await a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on the scope of federal bribery law, an Illinois federal judge ruled Friday, saying that decision will have "little or no impact" on Burke's fate.

  • June 21, 2024

    Settlement Ends Amazon Warehouse Construction Fight

    A settlement has resolved a dispute between an electric subcontractor and a construction company over the delayed building of an Amazon warehouse in south Georgia, according to a joint motion to dismiss filed Thursday in federal court.

  • June 21, 2024

    Parker McCay Hit With Malpractice Suit Over Biz Departure

    Law firm Parker McCay and one of its former attorneys have been hit with a malpractice lawsuit in New Jersey state court by a former client accusing the firm of failing to advise him about the impropriety of withdrawing hundreds of thousands of dollars from a construction company.

  • June 21, 2024

    Ex-Cognizant Execs Keep Pushing For Debevoise Testimony

    Former Cognizant Technology Solutions executives have pushed back on Debevoise & Plimpton LLP's bid to quash a subpoena seeking testimony from a firm partner for their upcoming bribery trial in New Jersey federal court, saying that the testimony would be relevant and that any potential privilege arguments have already been waived.

  • June 21, 2024

    Rebar Co. Says Feds Spurned Data For Info 'On The Internet'

    A Turkish rebar company pressed the U.S. Court of International Trade to order U.S. trade officials to reassess its countervailing duties, saying officials incorrectly excluded a commissioned study from the review for a report posted online.

  • June 21, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen JD Wetherspoon sue a Welsh pub over its name in the Intellectual Property Court, ex-professional boxer Amir Khan and his wife file libel action against an influencer, the Performing Right Society hit with a competition claim over music licensing, and Manolete Partners bring action against the directors of a bust investment firm. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • June 20, 2024

    Panama Claims Immunity In Construction Firm's Countersuit

    Panama has urged a Florida federal court to reject a Miami businessman's countersuit alleging that a previous settlement bars the enforcement of a $4.8 million arbitral award against him and his construction firm, saying that it has immunity and that no such agreement existed.

Expert Analysis

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Energy Community Tax Credit Boost Will Benefit Wind Sector

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    Recent Internal Revenue Service guidance broadening tax credit eligibility to more parts of offshore wind facilities in so-called energy communities is a win for the industry, which stands to see more projects qualify for a particularly valuable bonus in the investment tax credit context due to the capital-intensive nature of offshore wind projects, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Weisselberg's Perjury At Trial Spotlights Atty Ethics Issues

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    Former Trump Organization executive Allen Weisselberg’s recent guilty plea for perjury in the New York attorney general's civil fraud trial should serve as a reminder to attorneys of their ethical duties when they know a client has lied or plans to lie in court, and the potential penalties for not fulfilling those obligations, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Climate Disclosure Mandates Demand A Big-Picture Approach

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    As carbon emissions disclosure requirements from the European Union, California and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission take effect, the best practice for companies is not targeted compliance with a given reporting regime, but rather a comprehensive approach to systems assessment and management, says David Smith at Manatt.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Trump's NY Civil Fraud Trial Spotlights Long-Criticized Law

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    A New York court’s recent decision holding former President Donald Trump liable for fraud brought old criticisms of the state law used against him back into the limelight — including its strikingly broad scope and its major departures from the traditional elements of common law fraud, say Mark Kelley and Lois Ahn at MoloLamken.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • Beware OSHA's Aggressive Stance Toward Safety Violations

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    The solicitor of labor's recent enforcement report shows the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will increasingly consider creative enforcement measures and even criminal referrals to hold employers accountable for workplace safety infractions, say Ronald Taylor and Page Kim at Venable.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • What Nevada 'Superbasin' Ruling Means For Water Users

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    The Nevada Supreme Court's recent decision in Sullivan v. Lincoln County Water District, affirming that the state can manage multiple predesignated water basins as one "superbasin," significantly broadens the scope of water constraints that project developers in Nevada and throughout the West may need to consider, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

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