Corporate Crime & Compliance UK

  • June 27, 2024

    Barclays Says Businessmen Breached £13.7M Freezing Order

    Barclays Bank PLC told a London court Thursday that three businessmen breached a freezing order by moving assets offshore as it sued them, claiming they conspired to take £13.7 million ($17.4 million) by exploiting its overdraft mechanism.

  • June 27, 2024

    NCA Must Reconsider Uyghur Chinese Cotton Probe

    The U.K.'s National Crime Agency must reconsider its decision refusing to launch a broad investigation into imported cotton produced by the forced labor of Uyghur people in China, a London appellate court ruled Thursday in a first-of-its-kind decision that could disrupt retail supply chains.

  • June 27, 2024

    Xeinadin Sues Ex-Director, Wife Over Breach Of Duties

    Xeinadin has sued the former director of an accountancy firm it acquired and his wife for more than £1 million ($1.2 million) it claims it is owed from the deal to buy their stake in the firm after it sacked him amid allegations of fraud.

  • June 27, 2024

    FCA Official Vows To Pick Up The Pace Of Fraud Probes

    The Financial Conduct Authority is working to increase the "pace" of its investigations of fraud and other financial crimes as a law enforcer and regulator, the watchdog's joint head of enforcement said.

  • June 27, 2024

    Prince Harry Must Disclose Ghostwriter Texts To News Group

    Prince Harry was ordered by a judge Thursday to provide documents including messages between him and his ghostwriter to the U.K. arm of Rupert Murdoch's media empire in its fight against his invasion of privacy claim, after the publisher accused the royal of destroying evidence.

  • June 27, 2024

    Amazon Hit With Fresh £2.7B Class Action By Online Sellers

    Amazon was hit Thursday with a £2.7 billion ($3.4 billion) class action claim in London for allegedly abusing its dominant position in the supply of e-commerce marketplace services and discriminating against more than 200,000 U.K. sellers on its platform.

  • June 26, 2024

    Julian Assange Freed After Judge Accepts US Plea Deal

    Julian Assange returned to his native Australia on Wednesday hours after a federal judge in the Northern Mariana Islands accepted his plea deal with the U.S. Department of Justice and sentenced him to time served for conspiring to disclose national security information.

  • June 26, 2024

    Italian Co. To Pay Feds $538K Over N. Korean Animation Job

    Mondo TV has agreed to pay $538,000 to resolve allegations by the U.S. Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control that the Italy-based animation studio violated American sanctions regulations by paying an animation studio tied to the North Korean government through U.S. financial institutions, OFAC announced Wednesday.

  • June 26, 2024

    Ex-Ticketmaster Exec Pleads Guilty In Hacking Case

    A former director of client relations at Ticketmaster pled guilty Wednesday to taking part in a scheme to hack into a rival company's computer system in an attempt to gain a competitive advantage.

  • June 26, 2024

    Serco Case Could Spur Claims Despite Absence Of Case Law

    Serco's recent mid-trial settlement with investors over an overcharging scandal means key legal questions in a novel area of law remain untested — but suggests there is value to be had for shareholders suing several other London-listed companies following stock price drops.

  • June 26, 2024

    Financier Seeks Absolution In Vatican Real Estate Deal Trial

    An Italian financier and his companies argued at a London trial Wednesday that the Vatican's allegations that he was involved in an unlawful conspiracy over a London property deal are "incoherent and confused," claiming he acted in good faith throughout the transactions.

  • June 26, 2024

    Ex-BHS Director Ordered To Pay £50M Over Firm's Collapse

    A London judge has ordered a former director of the now-defunct British Home Stores to pay £50 million ($63.2 million) in damages after concluding he had committed trading misfeasance and wrongful trading during the company's high-profile downfall.

  • June 26, 2024

    FCA Asked To Block Shein IPO Over Forced Labor Concerns

    A Uyghur rights group said Wednesday that it has teamed up with Leigh Day to block Shein from floating on the London Stock Exchange over concerns it uses forced labor.

  • June 26, 2024

    Gas Plant Subcontractor Fights £170M Fraud Suit On Appeal

    A gas plant subcontractor relaunched its fight on Wednesday to strike out an engineering company's £170 million ($215 million) claim that it lied about its experience building similar plants ahead of a failed project.

  • June 26, 2024

    Workers Can Appeal Dyson Forced Labor Case In Malaysia

    Migrant workers in Malaysia have won their bid for a second chance to convince the courts that their allegations of forced labor and mistreatment by their employer, ATA Industrial, a large publicly listed Malaysian manufacturer, should be heard in the U.K., the law firm representing them said Wednesday.

  • June 26, 2024

    Mitie Settles £260M Prison Contract Award Dispute With Gov't

    The U.K.'s Ministry of Justice has settled a claim brought by prison services contractor Mitie that accused the government of unlawfully awarding a £260 million ($328 million) prison management contract to its rival.

  • June 26, 2024

    SDT Should Have Granted Anonymity In Iraqi AML Probe

    A London court has ruled that the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal should have granted an anonymity order to protect client privilege amid its probe into a solicitor's dealings with an Iraqi family, but the judge agreed that the lawyer did not breach anti-money laundering regulations.

  • June 26, 2024

    Aviva Sees 39% Rise In Insurance Fraud Claims

    Insurance giant Aviva on Wednesday said it spotted 39% more instances of fraud in 2023 than it did in the year previous, despite the value of fraudulent claims being lower than 2022.

  • July 03, 2024

    Paul Hastings Adds 12-Lawyer White Collar Team In Paris

    Paul Hastings LLP has boosted its capacity to advise clients on white collar cases and legal actions concerning environmental, social and governance matters by hiring a team of 12 lawyers from a specialist litigation and investigations firm in Paris.

  • June 25, 2024

    Hedge Fund Exec Avoids Prison After Forex-Rigging Trial

    The founder of U.K.-based Glen Point Capital on Tuesday was spared prison time following his conviction at trial for unlawfully manipulating the foreign exchange market in order to secure a $20 million payout for the hedge fund.

  • June 25, 2024

    UK Billionaire's Pilot Avoids Prison For Insider Trading

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced a former private jet pilot to house arrest Tuesday for insider trading on stock tips from his billionaire boss Joe Lewis, finding that a prison term would be unfair in comparison to Lewis' non-incarceratory sentence.

  • June 25, 2024

    Int'l Paper Gets US Clearance On $7.2B DS Smith Buy

    International Paper Co. and its U.K. competitor DS Smith PLC said Tuesday that the waiting period for U.S. antitrust authorities to try and block their planned roughly $7.2 billion merger has expired. 

  • June 25, 2024

    NatWest Faces Fight To Revive Design School Fraud Case

    The founders of an interior design school asked an appeals court to revive their fraud claim against NatWest on Tuesday, arguing that a settlement did not block their case that the bank pretended to help while trying to take the school's assets.

  • June 25, 2024

    Law Firm Faces £35M Suit Over Troubled Care Home Scheme

    Liquidators for a now-defunct group of companies have accused a law firm of ignoring the signs that their client was defrauding investors out of millions of pounds through a luxury care home Ponzi scheme.

  • June 25, 2024

    Assange Plea Deal Vindicates 'Fight To The End' Strategy

    Julian Assange's plea deal with U.S. authorities has validated his legal team's decision to throw the kitchen sink opposing extradition, a strategy that may have cooled prosecutors' appetite for seeing the Wikileaks founder spend more time behind bars, lawyers say.

Expert Analysis

  • Mitigating Incarceration's Impacts On Foreign Nationals

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    Sentencing arguments that highlighted the disparate impact incarceration would have on a British national recently sentenced for insider training by a New York district court, when compared to similarly situated U.S. citizens, provide an example of the advocacy needed to avoid or mitigate problems unique to noncitizen defendants, say attorneys at Lankler Siffert.

  • How Sustainability Directive Will Contribute to EU Regulation

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    The EU Sustainability Directive, in potentially enhancing certain obligations and setting a new benchmark for environmental and human rights due diligence practices, is a significant piece of legislation that will likely support the broader legal framework of other laws in a developing legal puzzle, say Rebecca Chin and Silke Goldberg at HSF.

  • Experian Ruling Helps Cos. Navigate GDPR Transparency

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    In Information Commissioner v. Experian, the Upper Tribunal recently reaffirmed the lawfulness of the company's marketing practices, providing guidance that will assist organizations in complying with the GDPR’s transparency obligations, say lawyers at Jenner & Block.

  • Clarity Is Central Theme In FCA's Greenwashing Guidance

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    Recent Financial Conduct Authority guidance for complying with the U.K. regulator's anti-greenwashing rule sends an overarching message that sustainability claims must be clear, accurate and capable of being substantiated, say lawyers at Cadwalader.

  • What The EU Sustainability Directive Will Mean For Companies

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    The European Parliament’s recent approval of the landmark Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive provides welcome clarity for small and midsize enterprises regarding human rights and environmental due diligence expectations, forming part of a growing pressure on companies around the world to operate ethically and sustainably, say lawyers at Jenner & Block.

  • What Can Be Learned From CMA's Green Claims Investigation

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    The Competition and Markets Authority's recent investigation into retailers' allegedly misleading environmental claims demonstrates that all consumer-facing businesses must exercise caution and ensure their green credentials are genuine, say Charlotte Kong and Stephen Sidkin at Fox Williams.

  • The Art Of Corporate Apologies: Crafting An Effective Strategy

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    Public relations challenges often stop companies from apologizing amid alleged wrongdoing, but a recent U.K. government consultation seeks to make this easier, highlighting the importance of corporate apologies and measures to help companies balance the benefits against the potential legal ramifications, says Dina Hudson at Byfield Consultancy.

  • AI Tools Could Enhance UK Gov't Public Services Strategy

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    The government’s recently announced intention to pilot artificial intelligence tools in routine policy work is part of a wider strategy to revolutionize the delivery of public services, and could improve productivity and create efficiencies, provided it is mindful of the potential risks involved, say attorneys at Akin.

  • Taking Stock Of The Latest Criminal Court Case Statistics

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    The latest quarterly statistics on the type and volume of cases processed through the criminal court illustrate the severity of the case backlog, highlighting the need for urgent and effective investment in the system, say Ernest Aduwa and Jessica Sarwat at Stokoe Partnership.

  • ICO Data Protection Guidance Offers Clarity On Fining Powers

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    New guidance from the Information Commissioners' Office is designed to offer transparency about its fining powers, and, combined with the office's wide-ranging enforcement authority, clearly intends to ensure breaching companies concentrate on the external harm they cause and not only internal changes, say Robert Allen and Amelia Handoll-Clark at Simmons & Simmons.

  • Hugh Grant Case Raises Questions About Part 36 Offers

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    Actor Hugh Grant's recent decision to settle his privacy suit by accepting a so-called Part 36 offer from News Group — to avoid paying a larger sum in legal costs by proceeding to trial — illustrates how this legal mechanism can be used by parties to force settlements, raising questions about its tactical use and fairness, says Colin Campbell at Kain Knight.

  • Investment Security Act Fine-Tune May Help Businesses

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    Although the government’s recent response to feedback on the National Security and Investment Act regime makes it clear that its approach is one of fine-tuning and substantial reforms will have to wait, there is still room to ease the burden on businesses by issuing guidance and refining the terms of mandatory area definitions, say lawyers at Linklaters.

  • How New FCA Rules Strengthen Borrower Protections

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    The Financial Conduct Authority’s recently published final rules, aimed at strengthening protections for borrowers in financial difficulty by regularizing good practices across the industry, put its previous guidance on a permanent footing and send a clear message to firms that this issue remains a regulatory priority, say James Black, Julie Patient and Mark Aengenheister at Hogan Lovells.

  • How Cos. Can Prepare For EU's Forced Labor Regulation

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    Before a new European Union regulation takes effect banning products made with forced labor from the internal market, economic operators will need to get their supply chain compliance functions ready, familiarizing themselves with international standards and case law, say Vassilis Akritidis and Jean-Baptiste Blancardi at Crowell & Moring.

  • Opinion

    New Property Category Not Needed To Regulate Digital Assets

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    The U.K. Law Commission's exploration of whether to create a third category of property for digital assets is derived from a misreading of historical case law, and would not be helpful in resolving any questions surrounding digital assets, says Duncan Sheehan at the University of Leeds.

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