Corporate Crime & Compliance UK

  • June 24, 2024

    Julian Assange To Plead Guilty To US Charge, Feds Say

    Julian Assange will plead guilty to a single count of conspiring to disclose national security information, the U.S. Department of Justice told a federal court in the Northern Mariana Islands on Monday, likely ending the WikiLeaks founder's long-running battle to avoid a U.S. prison sentence.

  • June 24, 2024

    Fragrance Co. Fined €15.9M For Deleting WhatsApp Messages

    The European Commission fined International Flavors & Fragrances Inc. €15.9 million ($17 million) on Monday, after enforcers said a senior employee deleted WhatsApp messages during an investigation of potential anti-competitive activity in the fragrance industry.

  • June 24, 2024

    Businessman Sentenced For Disclosure Failings In Fraud Suit

    A real estate investor was given a suspended sentence by a London judge Monday for failing to hand over information about his financial assets to investors suing him for alleged fraud, despite a court order.

  • June 24, 2024

    BHS Asks For £133M In Damages From Former Director

    Liquidators for now-defunct retail chain British Home Stores argued Monday that one of the company's former directors owes it £133.5 million ($169.2 million), maintaining that the court should calculate damages from the day he was found to have agreed to a loan that was not in the interests of shareholders and not likely to save the business.

  • June 24, 2024

    German Banker's Cum-Ex Trial Dropped Due To Health

    The former chairman of M.M. Warburg & Co. KGaA will not face trial for alleged dividend-tax evasion linked to cum-ex transactions spanning from 2006 to 2019 after a German court halted the trial due to his health, according to a Monday court statement.

  • June 24, 2024

    Ex-Chief Of EU Lender Probed Over Corruption Allegations

    Werner Hoyer, the former head of the European Union's lending arm, is being investigated by the bloc's public prosecutor over corruption, abuse of influence and misappropriation allegations that he said on Monday were "unfounded and baseless."

  • June 24, 2024

    Dentons' Inadvertent AML Error Wasn't SRA Misconduct

    Dentons' U.K. arm failed in handling anti-money laundering checks on a politically exposed former client, but its oversight was entirely inadvertent and therefore did not amount to professional misconduct, a London tribunal has ruled.

  • June 24, 2024

    UAE Fund Can't Shake Asset Freeze As Mogul Chases £20M

    A London court agreed on Monday to continue a worldwide asset freezing order against a UAE sovereign wealth fund to allow an aviation tycoon to attempt to recover more than £20 million ($25.4 million) after a fraud allegedly assisted by a Dechert LLP partner.

  • June 24, 2024

    Charity Urges Better Ways To Fight Investment Greenwashing

    A legal environmental charity on Monday called for stronger measures to address the practice of misrepresenting financial products as environmentally friendly when they do not meet the necessary sustainability criteria.

  • June 24, 2024

    FCA Takes Action Against 3 Fund Mngrs On Risky Investments

    The financial watchdog said Monday that it has decided to ban and fine three individuals who ran fund manager SVS Securities PLC after it invested clients' pension money into high-risk bonds that have defaulted, threatening their retirement security.

  • June 24, 2024

    Apple Becomes 1st Target Of New EU Digital Markets Law

    European authorities provisionally accused Apple's App Store of violating its new digital antitrust law designed to curtail the power of Big Tech, claiming the iPhone maker's guidelines unfairly prevent developers from steering consumers to alternative platforms.

  • June 21, 2024

    UK Tax Fraud Cases Rose 49% Over One-Year Period

    The U.K. tax authority launched more criminal cases for tax fraud for the year ended June 30, 2023, increasing 49% from 63 cases for the previous year to 94, Pinsent Masons LLP said Monday.

  • June 21, 2024

    Apple Won't Offer AI Tools In EU Due To Regulatory Concerns

    Apple confirmed Friday that the tech giant isn't planning on releasing new artificial intelligence features in the European Union this year due to "regulatory uncertainties" involving the bloc's new Digital Markets Act and the potential security risks that complying with the DMA could pose to Apple users.

  • June 21, 2024

    Pay-For-Delay Drug Case Not Time-Barred, UK Tribunal Says

    The U.K. Competition Appeal Tribunal refused Friday to apply a much more restrictive statute of limitations that would toss government claims that Danish pharmaceutical company Lundbeck Ltd. and generic drug manufacturers anticompetitively agreed to delay generic competition to an antidepressant.

  • June 21, 2024

    Surveyor Wins £110K After Director's Unfounded Fraud Report

    A tribunal has ordered a surveyors company and two of its directors to pay a former trainee almost £110,000 ($139,000) after ruling that she was subject to harassment relating to her sex and victimization.

  • June 21, 2024

    Apple Can't Challenge £853M IPhone Battery Class Action

    Apple failed in its bid to challenge an £853 million ($1 billion) proposed class action that accuses it of concealing problems with batteries in the phones of 24 million customers, after an appeals court found Friday the claim had prospects of success.

  • June 21, 2024

    Part-Time Judge Gets Prison Over £1.8M Legal Aid Fraud

    A barrister and part-time judge was sentenced to three years in prison at a London criminal court Friday for fraudulently submitting false claims for criminal defense costs after he was convicted for engaging in a conspiracy to inflate legal fees.

  • June 21, 2024

    Russian Bank Founder Hit With Asset Freeze In $850M Claim

    A London judge froze the assets of the co-founder of a Russian bank in a hearing Friday, in the latest development of an $850 million fraud claim in which two Russian lenders are seeking to claw back allegedly embezzled funds.

  • June 21, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen JD Wetherspoon sue a Welsh pub over its name in the Intellectual Property Court, ex-professional boxer Amir Khan and his wife file libel action against an influencer, the Performing Right Society hit with a competition claim over music licensing, and Manolete Partners bring action against the directors of a bust investment firm. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • June 21, 2024

    Salmon Farmers Hit With £382M Price-Fixing Class Action

    Several Atlantic fish farming companies face a £382 million ($482 million) class action on behalf of millions of U.K. consumers who accuse the businesses of running a cartel to artificially inflate salmon prices.

  • June 21, 2024

    European Funds Want Laxer Rules On Derivatives Calls

    A European investment fund industry trade body has called for a reduction in proposed global rules to manage calls for extra money supporting derivatives positions intended to reduce the risk of a market crisis.

  • June 21, 2024

    Axiom Stays £65M Action As Directors Claim Bankruptcy

    A London judge ruled on Friday that shuttered firm Axiom Ince can stay its almost £65 million ($82 million) claim against its ex-director and several of his companies for allegedly misappropriating client funds, saying the main defendant has been declared bankrupt.

  • June 20, 2024

    SRA Confirms 20-Plus Investigations Into Post Office Scandal

    The solicitors' watchdog said Thursday it is running more than 20 investigations into practitioners and law firms implicated in the Post Office IT scandal — but maintained it has no plans to take enforcement action because the public is not at risk. 

  • June 20, 2024

    Mastercard Settles Retailers' Swipe Fees Group Litigation

    Mastercard has settled a class action claim brought by more than 1,900 businesses in ongoing litigation over allegations it imposed excessively high credit card fees on merchants, a person familiar with the case has confirmed.

  • June 20, 2024

    Financial Watchdog Launches First-Ever ESG Probe Into Biz

    The Financial Conduct Authority has opened its first-ever enforcement investigation into a company over climate-related issues, lawyers from an environmental legal campaign group said on Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • Gov't Probe Highlights Computer-Based Evidence Issues

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    A recently launched U.K. Home Office probe, following the alleged use of faulty data in criminal cases, illuminates the need for scrutiny on the presumed reliability of evidence from computer-based systems, says Jessica Sobey at Stokoe Partnership.

  • UK Courts Continue To Struggle With Crypto-Asset Cases

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    Although the common law has proved capable of applying established principles to crypto-assets, recent cases highlight persistent challenges in identifying defendants, locating assets and determining jurisdiction, suggesting that any meaningful development will likely come from legislative or regulatory change, say Emily Saunderson and Sam Mitchell at Quadrant Chambers.

  • Why Computer Evidence Is Not Always Reliable In Court

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    Recent challenges to the admissibility of encrypted communication from the messaging tool EncroChat highlight the flawed presumption in the U.K. common law framework that computer evidence is always accurate, and why a nuanced assessment of such evidence is needed, say Sam De Silva and Josie Welland at CMS Legal.

  • Comparing The UK And EU Approaches To AI Regulation

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    While there are significant points of convergence between the recently published U.K. approach to artificial intelligence regulation and the EU AI Act, there is also notable divergence between them, and it appears that the U.K. will remain a less regulatory environment for AI in the foreseeable future, say lawyers at Steptoe.

  • Lessons On Using 3rd-Party Disclosure Orders In Fraud Cases

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    The expansion of the gateway for service out of jurisdiction regarding third-party information orders has proven to be an effective tool against fraud since it was introduced in 2022, and recent case law offers practical tips on what applicants should be aware of when submitting such orders, says Rosie Wild at Cooke Young.

  • Compliance Points To Know About The EU Digital Services Act

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    Online service providers in the European Union should prioritize understanding the scope of the recently implemented Digital Services Act, their specific legal obligations under it and the practical steps they must take to comply with the new law while obeying a raft of overlapping EU digital reforms, say Leo Moore and Róisín Culligan at William Fry.

  • Independent Regulator Could Chip Away At FIFA Autonomy

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    After the U.K.'s recent proposal for an independent football regulator, FIFA's commitment to safeguarding football association autonomy remains unwavering, despite a history of complexities arising from controversies in the bidding and hosting of major tournaments, say Yasin Patel at Church Court Chambers and Caitlin Haberlin-Chambers at SLAM Global.

  • A Look At The Latest EU Alternative Investment Regulation

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    Recent amendments to the EU Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive governing a range of alternative investment funds reflect a growing regulatory focus on nonbanking financial institutions, which expand credit to support economic growth but carry a commensurate risk, say Juliette Mills and Alix Prentice at Cadwalader.

  • Unpacking The Law Commission's Digital Assets Consultation

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    The Law Commission recently published a consultation on recognizing a third personal property category to accommodate the development of digital assets, highlighting difficulties with current models of property rights and the potential consequences of considering digital assets as personal property, say Andrew Tsang and Tom Bacon at BCLP.

  • Unpacking The FCA's Approach To AML Compliance Failures

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    In light of the upward trend of skilled-person reviews by the Financial Conduct Authority, including the latest investigation into Lloyds' anti-money laundering controls, financial firms should familiarize themselves with the mechanisms of FCA supervision and enforcement investigations, says Kathryn Westmore at RUSI.

  • New Russia Sanctions Reveal Int'l Enforcement Capabilities

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    Significant new U.K., U.S. and EU sanctions imposed on Russia notably target Europe-based individuals and entities accused of sanctions evasion, and with an apparent political will to enhance capabilities, the rhetoric is translating into international enforcement activity, say lawyers at Cadwalader.

  • Legal Sector Will Benefit From New Data Security Standard

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    The U.K. Information Commissioner's Office-approved new privacy certification scheme for the legal profession will inevitably become the default for law firms, chambers and vendors to prove their U.K. General Data Protection Regulation compliance, says Orlagh Kelly at Briefed.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • EU Inquiry Offers First Insight Into Foreign Subsidy Law

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    The European Commission's first in-depth investigation under the Foreign Subsidies Regulation into a public procurement process, and subsequent brief on regulatory trends, sheds light on the commission's approach to such cases, as well as jurisdictional, procedural and substantive issues under the regulation, says Matthew Hall at McGuireWoods.

  • Opinion

    PACCAR Should Be 1st Step To Regulating Litigation Funders

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    Rather than reversing the U.K. Supreme Court's well-reasoned judgment in PACCAR v. Competition Appeal Tribunal, imposing a regulatory regime on litigation funders in parity with that of lawyers, legislators should build upon it to create a more transparent, competitive and fairer funding industry, says Rosa Curling at Foxglove.

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