Discrimination

  • July 05, 2024

    Armstrong Teasdale Resisted Diversity, Ex-DEI VP Says

    Armstrong Teasdale LLP's former vice president of diversity, equity and inclusion claims the law firm hired her to help it cultivate a more diverse workplace, but then blocked her attempts to make recommendations and improvements before wrongly firing her, according to a lawsuit recently filed in Missouri state court.

  • July 05, 2024

    How Reshaped Circuit Courts Are Faring At The High Court

    Seminal rulings from the U.S. Supreme Court's latest term will reshape many facets of American society in the coming years. Already, however, the rulings offer glimpses of how the justices view specific circuit courts, which have themselves been reshaped by an abundance of new judges.

  • July 05, 2024

    Breaking Down The Vote: The High Court Term In Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court's lethargic pace of decision-making this term left the justices to issue a slew of highly anticipated and controversial rulings during the term's final week — rulings that put the court's ideological divisions on vivid display. Here, Law360 takes a data dive into the numbers behind this court term.

  • July 05, 2024

    High Court Flexes Muscle To Limit Administrative State

    The U.S. Supreme Court's dismantling of a 40-year-old judicial deference doctrine, coupled with rulings stripping federal agencies of certain enforcement powers and exposing them to additional litigation, has established the October 2023 term as likely the most consequential in administrative law history.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Sharpest Dissents From The Supreme Court Term

    The U.S. Supreme Court's session ended with a series of blockbuster cases that granted the president broad immunity, changed federal gun policy and kneecapped administrative agencies. And many of the biggest decisions fell along partisan lines.

  • July 05, 2024

    5 Moments That Shaped The Supreme Court's Jan. 6 Decision

    When the high court limited the scope of a federal obstruction statute used to charge hundreds of rioters who stormed the Capitol, the justices did not vote along ideological lines. In a year marked by 6-3 splits, what accounts for the departure? Here are some moments from oral arguments that may have swayed the justices.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Funniest Moments Of The Supreme Court's Term

    In a U.S. Supreme Court term teeming with serious showdowns, the august air at oral arguments filled with laughter after an attorney mentioned her plastic surgeon and a justice seemed to diss his colleagues, to cite just two of the term's mirthful moments. Here, we look at the funniest moments of the term.

  • July 05, 2024

    Judge Should Have Been Disqualified From Case, Panel Said

    A Washington appeals court panel said a trial judge should have been disqualified over bias concerns raised by metro Seattle's bus agency in a worker discrimination case, according to an opinion that said the judge's order allowing an amended complaint was not a discretionary ruling in the case that would have forbid disqualification.

  • July 05, 2024

    8th Circ. Rejects 3M Vax Mandate Critic's Religious Bias Suit

    The Eighth Circuit upheld the dismissal Friday of a 3M worker's suit claiming he was harassed by the company to get immunized against COVID-19 in violation of his Christian beliefs, ruling that because he wasn't fired for opposing the since-repealed vaccine mandate, he can't support a bias case.

  • July 05, 2024

    5 Cases Against The EEOC To Watch In 2024's 2nd Half

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission finalized regulations governing the new Pregnant Workers Fairness Act and published long-anticipated guidance for combating workplace harassment this year, triggering lawsuits from Republican attorneys general and religious groups. Here's a look at a quintet of suits challenging those EEOC policy moves. 

  • July 05, 2024

    Tech Co. Wants To Undo $535K Retaliation Verdict

    A technology company on Wednesday asked a Georgia federal judge to overturn a jury's decision to award a Black worker $535,000 in damages after finding he was fired in retaliation for complaining that his supervisor discriminated against him and that he was denied a raise because of his race.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Firms That Won Big At The Supreme Court

    This U.S. Supreme Court term featured high-stakes oral arguments on issues including gerrymandering, abortion and federal agency authority, and a hot bench ever more willing to engage in a lengthy back-and-forth with advocates. Here's a look at the law firms that argued the most cases and how they fared.

  • July 05, 2024

    NY Forecast: Judge Weighs Dismissal Of Service Fee Tip Suit

    A New York federal judge on Monday will consider a Long Island restaurant's bid to dismiss a worker's lawsuit claiming the restaurant violated federal and state law by retaining a service charge instead of dividing it among servers as it told customers.

  • July 03, 2024

    Muldrow Revives Worker's Pregnancy Bias Suit, 3rd Circ. Says

    The Third Circuit reinstated parts of a worker's suit claiming she was forced to resign from Pennsylvania's probation board because she was denied light duty and remote assignments to accommodate her pregnancy, stating Wednesday a recent high court ruling requires another look at her case.

  • July 03, 2024

    11th Circ. Backs Fla. Sheriff's Win Over Ex-Captain's Bias Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit refused Wednesday to reopen a lawsuit accusing a Florida sheriff of violating a captain's legal rights during an internal investigation and then firing her because she's a gay woman, finding no issue with a trial court's dismissal of the case.

  • July 03, 2024

    Red States Get ACA Trans Discrimination Rule Blocked

    Federal judges in Mississippi and Texas granted conservatives states' requests Wednesday to freeze a new rule protecting access to healthcare for the LGBTQ+ community, with both judges ruling that states are likely to succeed in showing that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services overstepped when it created the regulations.

  • July 03, 2024

    AFSCME Sues Philadelphia Over Mandatory Return To Office

    American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees affiliates accused the city of Philadelphia of violating labor contracts by not bargaining over the end to remote work, telling a state court that the city's move would impact around 2,900 workers in the bargaining unit.

  • July 03, 2024

    Judge Trims Retailer's Defenses In Long COVID EEOC Suit

    A Colorado federal judge struck several of an appliance retailer's affirmative defenses Wednesday in a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission lawsuit alleging it wrongfully terminated a worker who asked for more time off to deal with long COVID symptoms.

  • July 03, 2024

    Doctor Who Won $12M Assault Case Can't Revive USC Claims

    A female doctor who won a $12 million verdict against a male colleague over a sexual assault at a Los Angeles County hospital affiliated with USC's Keck School of Medicine can't revive sexual harassment claims against the university and the county, a California appellate court held.

  • July 03, 2024

    Job Hopeful's Lack Of Injury Sinks Wash. Pay Disclosure Suit

    A Washington federal judge tossed a job hopeful's suit claiming healthcare companies shirked state pay transparency laws by failing to disclose salary information in job postings, finding that the applicant didn't show he was actually harmed by the missing compensation figures.

  • July 03, 2024

    Calif. Watchdog Notches $14.4M Deal In Microsoft Leave Fight

    Microsoft agreed to shell out $14.4 million to end a California Civil Rights Department's lawsuit claiming that it discriminated against employees who take protected employment leaves, the department announced Wednesday.

  • July 03, 2024

    White Male Anchor Says CBS' Diversity Goals Got Him Fired

    CBS Broadcasting Inc. needed to solve its "white problem" so it excluded an experienced white male anchor from promotional events and then fired him in order to replace him with a young Black reporter, a complaint filed in California federal court said.

  • July 03, 2024

    4 Argument Sessions Bias Attys Should Watch In July

    A diver will defend her win in a sex bias case before the Sixth Circuit, while the U.S. Postal Service and a Christian mailman who wanted Sundays off will cross swords in district court after the U.S. Supreme Court revived his case last summer. Here are four arguments that lawyers should have on their radar in July.

  • July 03, 2024

    Del. DOT Must Face Asian Worker's Promotion Bias Suit

    The Delaware Department of Transportation can't defeat a former engineer's lawsuit claiming he was repeatedly passed over for promotion because he's Asian, a federal judge ruled, finding the worker provided enough evidence to cast doubt on the agency's rationale that his interview performance was lackluster.

  • July 03, 2024

    Constangy Hires Greenspoon Marder Partner In LA

    Constangy Brooks Smith & Prophete LLP has hired a former deputy attorney general for the California Department of Justice, who is joining from Greenspoon Marder LLP where she led that firm's employment litigation group, the firm announced Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Texas Hair Bias Ruling Does Not Give Employers A Pass

    Author Photo

    A Texas state court’s recent decision, holding that a school could discipline a student with locs for refusing to cut his hair, should not be interpreted by employers as a license to implement potentially discriminatory grooming policies, says Dawn Holiday at Jackson Walker.

  • Broadway Ruling Puts Discrimination Claims In The Limelight

    Author Photo

    A New York federal court's recent decision in Moore v. Hadestown Broadway that the employers' choice to replace a Black actor with a white actor was shielded by the First Amendment is the latest in a handful of rulings zealously protecting hiring decisions in casting, say Anthony Oncidi and Dixie Morrison at Proskauer.

  • Breaking Down California's New Workplace Violence Law

    Author Photo

    Ilana Morady and Patrick Joyce at Seyfarth discuss several aspects of a new California law that requires employers to create and implement workplace violence prevention plans, including who is covered and the recordkeeping and training requirements that must be in place before the law goes into effect on July 1.

  • Studying NY, NJ Case Law On Employee Social Media Rights

    Author Photo

    While a New Jersey state appeals court has twice determined that an employee's termination by a private employer for social media posts is not prohibited, New York has yet to take a stand on the issue — so employers' decisions on such matters still need to be assessed on a case-by-case basis, say Julie Levinson Werner and Jessica Kriegsfeld at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Eye On Compliance: Employee Social Media Privacy In NY

    Author Photo

    A New York law that recently took effect restricts employers' ability to access the personal social media accounts of employees and job applicants, signifying an increasing awareness of the need to balance employers' interests with worker privacy and free speech rights, says Madjeen Garcon-Bonneau at Wilson Elser.

  • Draft Pay Equity Rule May Pose Contractor Compliance Snags

    Author Photo

    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed rule that would prohibit government contractors from requesting certain job applicants' salary history seems simple on the surface, but achieving compliance will be a nuanced affair for many contractors who must also adhere to state and local pay transparency laws, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • What Texas Employers Should Know After PWFA Ruling

    Author Photo

    After a Texas federal judge recently enjoined federal agencies from enforcing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act against the state of Texas, all employers must still remain sensitive to local, state and federal protections for pregnant workers, and proactive in their approach to pregnancy-related accommodations, says Maritza Sanchez at Phelps Dunbar.

  • AI In Performance Management: Mitigating Employer Risk

    Author Photo

    Companies are increasingly turning to artificial intelligence tools in performance management, exposing organizations to significant risks, which they can manage through employee training, bias assessments, and comprehensive policies and procedures related to the new technology, say Gregory Brown and Cindy Huang at Jackson Lewis.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

    Author Photo

    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • What 2 Years Of Ukraine-Russia Conflict Can Teach Cos.

    Author Photo

    A few key legal lessons for the global business community since Russia's invasion of Ukraine could help protect global commerce in times of future conflict, including how to respond to disparate trade restrictions and sanctions, navigate war-related contract disputes, and protect against heightened cybersecurity risks, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

    Author Photo

    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • Shaping Speech Policies After NLRB's BLM Protest Ruling

    Author Photo

    After the National Labor Relations Board decided last month that a Home Depot employee was protected by federal labor law when they wore a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron, employers should consider four questions in order to mitigate legal risks associated with workplace political speech policies, say Louis Cannon and Cassandra Horton at Baker Donelson.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

    Author Photo

    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.