Employment UK

  • June 10, 2024

    Union Federation Botched Worker Investigation, Tribunal Says

    A tribunal has upheld the unfair dismissal claims of two trade unionists who were accused of misconduct, ruling there was not enough evidence against the pair in light of their employer's poor investigation against them.

  • June 10, 2024

    Disney Dodges Child Actor's Late Discrimination Claim

    Disney avoided facing a child actor's discrimination case after a tribunal ruled that there was no good explanation for her mother waiting 10 months after the deadline to submit the claim on her behalf.

  • June 10, 2024

    Next Gov't To Face Tough Pension Decisions, IFS Warns

    The next government will need to make some urgent decisions on pension reforms to ensure future retirees are protected, an influential think-tank has warned ahead of the July 4 general election.

  • June 10, 2024

    Lib Dems Vow To Raise Capital Gains Tax For UK's Wealthiest

    The U.K.'s third-largest political party vowed on Monday to raise taxes on the country's wealthiest individuals if it wins the next election, in a bid to raise £5 billion ($6.4 billion) for the National Health Service.

  • June 10, 2024

    Amazon Sold Facial Tech To Russia, Ex-Employee Alleges

    A former Amazon worker has alleged that the technology giant sold facial recognition software to a Russian company in violation of U.K. sanctions.

  • June 10, 2024

    10% Of Early Pension Dippers Regret Withdrawals

    Approximately one in 10 retirees aged 55 and older who withdrew money from their pension before retirement said they regretted doing so, a retirement savings company said on Monday.

  • June 10, 2024

    What Tax Experts Hope To See In Labour's Manifesto

    Labour's policy manifesto, expected to be unveiled on Thursday, will be studied by tax lawyers for more detail on the fiscal planning being carried out by the clear favorite to win the general election, including a final word on lifetime pension savings.

  • June 07, 2024

    Police Officers Win Case For Rest Breaks While On Standby

    Humberside police officers won their claim that time on standby counts as working time, entitling them to take daily rest breaks that were previously refused, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • June 07, 2024

    Axed Telecom CEO Loses Early Battle In Whistleblower Suit

    A former interim chief executive officer at a telecom company has failed for now to get her job back, with a tribunal saying it was unconvinced by her early-stage claim that she was unfairly dismissed for calling out allegedly unlawful business proposals that would breach agreements with HSBC.

  • June 07, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen British broadcaster GB News hit with a libel claim by climate activist Dale Vince, MGM take aim at an immersive events company over intellectual property rights to the James Bond franchise, and law firms Stephenson Harwood and Bowen-Morris & Partners tackle a contracts claim by investment adviser Yieldstreet. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • June 07, 2024

    UK Sued Over Plan To Raise Income Threshold For Visa

    A campaign group for the families of migrants is suing the British government over plans to raise the income requirement for visas for spouses, partners or family members, arguing that the policy is having a "devastating impact."

  • June 07, 2024

    Fired NCA Trainee Loses Sex Bias Claim Over Childcare Duty

    The National Crime Agency did not discriminate against a former trainee based on his sex by limiting how flexibly he could work in order to look after his two young children, a tribunal has ruled.

  • June 07, 2024

    'Squeezed Middle' Pension Schemes Urged To Be Flexible

    Defined benefit pension schemes with assets between £10 million ($12.7 million) and £250 million are the new "squeezed middle" in the retirement savings market, Hymans Robertson has said, encouraging those plans to remain flexible amid the challenges they face.

  • June 07, 2024

    30% Of UK Workers Unsure How To Access Pensions

    An estimated 30% of British workers are unsure about their retirement options and worry about how to access their savings, according to a study published by TPT Retirement Solutions Ltd.

  • June 06, 2024

    Post Office Board Missed Clues, Former Chair Tells Inquiry

    A former chair of the Post Office Ltd. board told the inquiry into the Horizon IT scandal on Thursday that the board did not act on a number of "clues" suggesting that the company was wrongly prosecuting innocent subpostmasters.

  • June 06, 2024

    Fired Ikea Worker Loses COVID-19 Harassment Claim

    An ex-Ikea employee has lost his case that he was unfairly dismissed and harassed over his opposition to COVID-19 safety measures, as an employment tribunal ruled that his beliefs were not challenged, only his behavior.

  • June 06, 2024

    Solicitor Wins Worker Status In Unfair Dismissal Claim

    An employment judge has ruled that a consultant solicitor working on "flexible terms" for a U.K. law firm counts as a worker, rather than being self-employed, in her unfair dismissal claim against the firm.

  • June 06, 2024

    Pension Funding Levels 'Stable' Ahead Of Looming Election

    The political party that wins the July 4 general election will is likely to operate within an environment of stable funding for retirement savings plans, a consultancy said Thursday, as it highlighted the "relatively" consistent levels of funding in the past year.

  • June 06, 2024

    Imam Wins £20K From Mosque Over Religious Harassment

    A mosque in northern England must pay its former Sunni imam £20,000 ($25,570) after a tribunal ruled members of the place of worship accused him of following the beliefs of a rival branch of Islam, which left him with no choice but to quit.

  • June 06, 2024

    Rwanda Plan Forces Civil Servants To Break Law, Union Says

    Civil servants will be forced to violate international human rights law and their workplace code of conduct if the government requires them to process deportation flights to Rwanda against Strasbourg's rulings, a trade union argued at a London court on Thursday.

  • June 06, 2024

    HMRC Harassed Protesting Staffer With Relocation Ultimatum

    HM Revenue and Customs harassed an employee based on her race by asking her to withdraw a discrimination grievance in return for making her transfer to a new office permanent, a tribunal has ruled.

  • June 06, 2024

    Labour Drops Antisemitism Report Leak Claim On Ex-Staffers

    The Labour Party dropped on Thursday its legal claims against five former employees who it said conspired to leak a damning report on how its internal disciplinary body mishandled allegations of antisemitism and undermined its leader at the time, Jeremy Corbyn.

  • June 05, 2024

    Scottish Defenders Boycott Abuse Cases As Pay Talks Stall

    Criminal defense lawyers in Scotland have restarted their boycott of domestic abuse cases after talks with the Scottish government over legal aid reform broke down.

  • June 05, 2024

    Climate Risk Must Form Part Of Trustee Role

    A quarter of pension scheme trustees want a new interpretation of their fiduciary duties to allow them to consider climate risk because doing so will help tackle the dangers posed by a changing environment, Lane Clark & Peacock LLP said Wednesday.

  • June 05, 2024

    Slater And Gordon Fight Ex-Analyst's Redundancy Appeal

    Slater and Gordon LLP challenged on Wednesday an appeal by a former costs analyst, who claims that he was made redundant because he was mentally unwell and wrongly deprived of most of a £20,000 ($25,500) bonus.

Expert Analysis

  • Perks And Potential Legal Pitfalls Of Int'l Remote Working

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    In a tight labor market, employers can entice prospective employees with international remote working, but should be aware of key immigration, data protection and tax issues, says Tim Hayes at BDB Pitmans.

  • UK Tribunal Ruling Sheds Light On Workplace Speech Issues

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    The U.K. Employment Appeal Tribunal's recent judgment in Higgs v. Farmor's School — concerning a Christian employee dismissed for allegedly anti-LGBT social media posts — highlights factors that employers should consider in tricky situations involving employees' speech, says Anna Bond at Lewis Silkin.

  • Tackling Global Inflation Is A Challenge For Antitrust Agencies

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    Recent events have put pressure on antitrust agencies to address the global cost-of-living crisis, but the relationship between competition and inflation is complex, and with competition agencies’ reluctance to act as price regulators, enforcement is unlikely to have a meaningful impact, say lawyers at Linklaters.

  • Employment Tribunal Data Offers Workplace Practice Insights

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    A breakdown of the Ministry of Justice's recent Employment Tribunal figures shows shifting trends among employees, and potential challenges and possible improvement areas for employers, and if the data continues to be published, it could play an essential part in clearing the fast-growing backlog of tribunal matters, says Gemma Clark at Wright Hassall.

  • Unpacking The Rwanda Policy Appeal Decision

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    The Court of Appeal recently declared the U.K. government's Rwanda policy unlawful in AAA v. Secretary of State, but given that this was only on the basis that Rwanda is not currently a safe third country, it is possible that the real risk of Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights breaches will be obviated, says Alex Papasotiriou at Richmond Chambers.

  • Opinion

    Why Menstrual Leave Policies May Be Counterproductive

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    Efforts to introduce U.K. standards on leave for menstruation, which in practice has been narrowly applied, may be distracting focus from pay gap and family rights laws, and robust sick leave policies that may be more relevant to tackling gender equality in the workplace, say Sean Nesbitt and Sophie Davidson at Taylor Wessing.

  • Opinion

    UK Noncompete Cap Will Not Grow Business As Intended

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    The U.K. government's recent response to its 2020 consultation on restrictive covenants has not given any obvious consideration to the position of employers, as there is no evidence supporting its proposition that limiting noncompetes to three months will assist recruitment and help employees find new jobs at often higher pay, says David Whincup at Squire Patton.

  • Workplace Neurotech Requires A Balance Of Risk And Reward

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    The U.K. Information Commissioner's Office's recently released a report on neurotech, and while such technologies could unlock a stubbornly low productivity stagnation, they pose employer data compliance questions and potential employee discrimination risks, say Ingrid Hesselbo and Ben Milloy at Fladgate.

  • ITV Scandal Offers Important Considerations On HR Policies

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    The recent resignation of former ITV host Phillip Schofield after admitting to an affair with a younger staff member raises questions on employers' duty of care and highlights the need for not only having the right internal policies in place but also understanding and applying them, says Hina Belitz at Excello Law.

  • What The Italian Whistleblowing Decree Means For Employers

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    The new Italian whistleblowing decree, guidelines to which must be adopted by authorities this week, represents a major milestone in protecting employees by broadening employers' obligations, and it is essential that multinational companies with an interest in Italy verify their compliance with the more stringent requirements, say lawyers at Studio Legale Chiomenti.

  • What TPR's Guidance On DEI Means For Pensions Industry

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    The Pension Regulator is one of the first regulators to issue guidance on equality, diversity and inclusion, and employers and trustees should incorporate its advice by developing policies and monitoring progress to ensure that improvements are made regularly, say lawyers at Linklaters.

  • 10 Tips On Drafting A Company Code Of Ethics

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    In light of a recent report that less than 50% of companies on the FTSE 250 and 350 indexes have a code of ethics, it is clear that more organizations should be informed of the reasons for having one, like reducing risk and solidifying commitment to integrity, and how to implement it, says Shiv Haria-Shah at Fieldfisher.

  • Breaking Down Germany's New Whistleblower Protection Act

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    Germany recently passed a whistleblowing law, which will bring new obligations for companies, and businesses with more than 50 employees must now check whether they have adequate reporting lines in place and properly staffed functions to handle whistleblower reports, say Mark Zimmer and Katharina Humphrey at Gibson Dunn.

  • UK Case Shows Risks Of Taking Shortcuts In Fund Payments

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    While the High Court recently reversed a decision in Floreat Investment Management v. Churchill, finding that investors routing funds into their own accounts was not dishonest, the case serves as a cautionary tale on the dangers of directing investment funds other than as contractually provided, say lawyers at Dechert.

  • How The UK Employment Court Backlogs Jeopardize Justice

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    While employment tribunal case delays may not top the agenda of new Secretary of State for Justice Alex Chalk, recent data reveals deep and long-term issues, including a staggering half a million current or former employees waiting for their case to trudge forward in the queue, says Heather Wilmot at ARAG.

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