Employment

  • July 15, 2024

    Judge Says Attys Must Hash Out Conflict In Twitter Row

    A California federal judge has rebuked both sides of a suit alleging Twitter violated federal labor laws amid a mass layoff in late 2022, ordering lead attorneys to attend a meet and confer session in August to work through ongoing conflicts that have arisen since the claims were filed in April 2023.

  • July 15, 2024

    Yellow Corp. Denied Redo In $137M Teamsters Fight

    A Kansas federal judge held firm Monday on her decision to throw out Yellow Corp.'s $137 million lawsuit against the Teamsters, in which the trucking company accused the union of driving it into bankruptcy by fighting a necessary corporate restructuring.

  • July 15, 2024

    EMS Workers Want Early Win In OT Gap Dispute

    A class and collective of emergency medical services workers asked a North Carolina federal court for summary judgment in their overtime suit against a county, arguing basic math proves employees were underpaid in violation of an ordinance.

  • July 15, 2024

    UAW Staff Culture Needs More Work, Monitor Says

    Remnants remain of the "culture of fear and reprisal" that gripped the United Auto Workers when union leaders were embezzling funds and accepting bribes from automakers in the 2010s, but progress has been made toward cultural change at the union, a court-appointed monitor said in his latest report.

  • July 15, 2024

    Fired NJ Cops Say ALJ's Ruling Backs Their Off-Duty Pot Use

    An administrative law judge's decision reinstating a Jersey City police officer to her job after she was fired for off-duty marijuana use provides an argument for dismissing the city's lawsuit against the state in which it argues that federal law is at odds with New Jersey law, police officers say in a letter filed Monday in federal court.

  • July 15, 2024

    JPMorgan Chase Workers Had To Eat At Desks, Suit Says

    Chase Bank encouraged workers to perform off-the-clock work but failed to pay them accordingly, while also giving them so much work that they were forced to take their meals at their desks, a former employee said in a suit in California state court.

  • July 15, 2024

    New York AG Lobs New Challenge To Rec Sports Trans Ban

    New York Attorney General Letitia James and a local roller derby league each sued to strike down a newly passed law banning transgender women and girls from participating in recreational sports at facilities run by Nassau County on Monday, reviving a bitter legal fight.

  • July 15, 2024

    HVAC Co. To Pay Workers $850K to End Wage Class Deal

    An HVAC company has agreed to pay $850,000 to settle an ex-technician's proposed class action alleging meal break and wage violations, according to a bid for preliminary approval filed in Washington state court.

  • July 15, 2024

    Split 2nd Circ. Nixes Surgeon's Default In Sex Assault Case

    A split panel of the Second Circuit said a Connecticut surgeon should have been fully freed from the default judgment against him in a sex assault suit after a jury concluded his accuser failed to prove the assault happened, with one judge dissenting Monday that parts of the default ruling should remain.

  • July 15, 2024

    8th Circ. Revives Cop's Biased Transfer Suit After Muldrow

    The Eighth Circuit reinstated a St. Louis police officer's suit alleging he was reassigned to a different unit for being straight, reversing its prior decision affirming the dismissal of his suit following a U.S. Supreme Court order loosening requirements the circuit placed on Title VII discrimination claims.

  • July 15, 2024

    PBGC Seeks Early Win In $7.8B Pension Fight In Yellow Ch. 11

    The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. has filed a motion for partial summary judgment in the Chapter 11 case of trucking firm Yellow Corp., telling a Delaware bankruptcy judge the $7.8 billion dispute over Yellow's withdrawal from multistate employee pension programs is a pure question of law that can be decided in the PBGC's favor.

  • July 15, 2024

    Union Fund Asks Justices To Reject Withdrawal Liability Case

    A pension fund for the International Association of Machinists urged the U.S. Supreme Court not to disturb its win in a dispute with two employers over the correct way to calculate how much employers must pay when they withdraw from multiemployer retirement plans, saying retroactive recalculations are valid.

  • July 15, 2024

    Seyfarth Adds 5-Atty Labor Team From Hunton In Calif., Texas

    Seyfarth Shaw LLP announced Monday that it has brought on a five-member team of labor and employment lawyers who previously practiced with Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP.

  • July 15, 2024

    McElroy Deutsch Fights 'Malicious' Claim In Exec Fraud Case

    McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP and its former business development director, who is accused of stealing millions from the firm partially via fraudulent credit card use, are at odds over whether the firm's ex-employee should be allowed to bring a malicious prosecution counterclaim in New Jersey state court.

  • July 15, 2024

    NJ Legal Software Biz Hit With Disability Bias Suit

    Leap Legal Software Inc. was hit with a discrimination lawsuit in New Jersey state court Friday from a former employee alleging she was fired due to her undiagnosed and untreated Lyme disease.

  • July 15, 2024

    Former Exec Slams Bowling Co.'s 'Elitist' $3.7M Atty Fee Bid

    The owners of the AMF and Lucky Strike bowling chains are not entitled to more than $3 million in attorney fees after winning a lawsuit, the target of the suit told a Virginia federal court while characterizing the owners as "bullies." 

  • July 15, 2024

    Machinery Co. Defends 'Right' To Ax Trans Care In Health Plan

    A turbomachinery company asked to intervene on a transgender worker's New Hampshire federal court claim that its health plan administrators violated Affordable Care Act anti-bias provisions by enforcing a gender dysphoria treatment ban in the company's health plan, arguing that the issue is intertwined with its mission.

  • July 15, 2024

    'Busy' Solo Atty Chided For Blown Deadline In Pa. Bias Case

    A Pennsylvania federal judge gave an earful to an attorney representing a Drexel University administrator suing the school for disability discrimination after the case was dismissed without prejudice over the attorney's missed deadlines.

  • July 15, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Chancery Court news was full of fees and settlements last week, with three multimillion-dollar deals getting a court OK, and a daylong discussion over a potentially multibillion-dollar fee award for attorneys who got Tesla CEO Elon Musk's astronomical pay package thrown out. The court also banged the gavel in cases involving e-payment venture SwervePay and managed care company Centene Corp., and heard arguments from software company SAP SE and biotech Renmatix Inc.

  • July 15, 2024

    Posner Can't Win Most Severe Sanctions In Ex-Staffer's Suit

    An Indiana federal judge stopped short of granting the most serious sanctions requested by retired Seventh Circuit Judge Richard Posner in his defense of a $170,000 breach of contract suit brought by a pro se litigation "expert," including the dismissal of the case and a "significant monetary" penalty.

  • July 15, 2024

    Gibson Dunn Grows NY Office With Proskauer Exec Comp Pro

    Gibson Dunn is continuing to grow its New York office, announcing Monday that it has brought a former Proskauer Rose LLP attorney to its executive compensation and employee benefits practice group.

  • July 15, 2024

    United Rentals Says It Caught Ex-Worker At Rival's Worksites

    United Rentals Inc.'s private investigators watched a former sales manager violate a one-year noncompete agreement covering a 50-mile radius by watching him don gear emblazoned with his new employer's logo and tracking him to three Connecticut sites staffed by at least two longtime customers, a newly filed lawsuit indicates.

  • July 15, 2024

    11th Circ. Upholds UMiami's Win In Retaliation Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit affirmed a Miami federal jury's verdict rejecting claims that the University of Miami fired a compliance officer for his refusal to close an investigation into the college's alleged Medicare overcharging, ruling that the officer had "invited" the jury instruction on which he based his appeal.

  • July 15, 2024

    Veteran Employment Litigator Jumps From Kasowitz To Akin

    A veteran employment litigator has joined Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP in New York after nearly 16 years at Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP.

  • July 15, 2024

    EEOC Commissioner Sonderling To Depart Agency

    EEOC Commissioner Keith Sonderling announced Monday he will leave the agency in August when his term ends, wrapping up a seven-year tenure with the federal government to return to the private sector.

Expert Analysis

  • Lessons In High-Profile Jury Selection Amid NY Trump Trial

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    Richard Gabriel and Michelle Rey LaRocca at Decision Analysis consider how media exposure can affect a prospective juror in a high-profile case, the misunderstood nature of bias, and recommendations for jury selection in these unique situations as the Trump hush money trial continues in New York.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Pitfalls When Withdrawing From A Case

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    The Trump campaign's recent scuffle over its bid to replace its counsel in a pregnancy retaliation suit offers a chance to remind attorneys that many troubles inherent in withdrawing from a case can be mitigated or entirely avoided by communicating with clients openly and frequently, says Christopher Konneker at Orsinger Nelson.

  • One Contract Fix Can Reduce Employer Lawsuit Exposure

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    A recent Fifth Circuit ruling that saved FedEx over $365 million highlights how a one-sentence limitation provision on an employment application or in an at-will employment agreement may be the easiest cost-savings measure for employers against legal claims, say Sara O'Keefe and William Wortel at BCLP.

  • Using A Children's Book Approach In Firm Marketing Content

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    From “The Giving Tree” to “Where the Wild Things Are,” most children’s books are easy to remember because they use simple words and numbers to tell stories with a human impact — a formula law firms should emulate in their marketing content to stay front of mind for potential clients, says Seema Desai Maglio at The Found Word.

  • The State Of Play In DEI And ESG 1 Year After Harvard Ruling

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    Almost a year after the U.S. Supreme Court decided Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard, attorney general scrutiny of environmental, social and governance-related efforts indicates a potential path for corporate diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives to be targeted, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • FTC Noncompete Rule Risks A Wave Of State AG Actions

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    The Federal Trade Commission's final rule language banning noncompetes may contribute to a waterfall enforcement effect in which state attorneys general deploy their broad authority to treat noncompetes as separate and independent violations, say Ryan Strasser and Carson Cox at Troutman Pepper.

  • How To Use Exhibits Strategically Throughout Your Case

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    Exhibits, and documents in particular, are the lifeblood of legal advocacy, so attorneys must understand how to wield them effectively throughout different stages of a case to help build strategy, elevate witness preparation and effectively persuade the fact-finders, say Allison Rocker at Baker McKenzie and Colorado prosecutor Adam Kendall.

  • Series

    Being An EMT Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While some of my experiences as an emergency medical technician have been unusually painful and searing, the skills I’ve learned — such as triage, empathy and preparedness — are just as useful in my work as a restructuring lawyer, says Marshall Huebner at Davis Polk.

  • Behind Court Challenges To The FTC's Final Noncompete Rule

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent final rule banning noncompetes may not go into effect any time soon amid a couple of Texas federal court challenges seeking to bar the rule's implementation, which will likely see appeals all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, says Michael Elkins at MLE Law.

  • 15 Quick Tips For Uncovering And Mitigating Juror Biases

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    As highlighted by the recent jury selection process in the criminal hush money trial against former President Donald Trump, juror bias presents formidable challenges for defendants, and attorneys must employ proactive strategies — both new and old — to blunt its impact, say Monica Delgado and Jonathan Harris at Harris St. Laurent.

  • Corporate Insurance Considerations For Trafficking Claims

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    With the surge in litigation over liability under the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act, corporate risk managers and in-house counsel need to ensure that appropriate insurance coverage is in place to provide for defense and indemnity against this liability, says Micah Skidmore at Haynes Boone.

  • High-Hazard Retailers: Are You Ready For OSHA Inspections?

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    In light of a bill introduced this month in Congress to protect warehouse workers, relevant employers — including certain retailers — should remain aware of an ongoing Occupational Safety and Health Administration initiative that has increased the likelihood of inspection over the next couple of years, say Julie Vanneman and Samantha Cook at Dentons Cohen.

  • Tips For Keeping Trade Secrets In The Vault

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    Key practices aimed at maintaining confidentiality can help companies establish trade secret status as the Federal Trade Commission's ban on noncompetes makes it prudent to explore other security measures, says John Baranello at Moses & Singer.

  • Navigating Title VII Compliance And Litigation Post-Muldrow

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Muldrow v. St. Louis has broadened the scope of Title VII litigation, meaning employers must reassess their practices to ensure compliance across jurisdictions and conduct more detailed factual analyses to defend against claims effectively, say Robert Pepple and Christopher Stevens at Nixon Peabody.

  • 3 Employer Lessons From NLRB's Complaint Against SpaceX

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    Severance agreements traditionally have included nondisparagement and nondisclosure provisions as a matter of course — but a recent National Labor Relations Board complaint against SpaceX underscores the ongoing efforts to narrow severance agreements at the state and federal levels, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

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