Florida

  • June 25, 2024

    IRS Apologizes To Hedge Fund Founder Over Leaked Tax Data

    The IRS issued an extraordinary public apology Tuesday to hedge fund founder and billionaire Ken Griffin for the leak of his and others' tax information to the media by a former contractor who admitted to stealing the returns of thousands of wealthy individuals, including former President Donald Trump.

  • June 24, 2024

    Billionaire Drops Case Against IRS Over Tax Info Leak

    Billionaire hedge fund founder Ken Griffin dropped his case Monday seeking to hold the IRS accountable for the leak of his tax return information in a data breach that affected thousands of wealthy and powerful taxpayers, including former President Donald Trump.

  • June 24, 2024

    Fintech Exec Gets 45 Months For Crypto Market Manipulation

    A Florida federal judge on Monday sentenced the CEO of fintech company Hydrogen Technology Corp. to more than three years in prison for his role in a conspiracy to manipulate the market for Hydrogen's digital assets.

  • June 24, 2024

    Auto Software Co. Facing Suit Over Ransomware Hack

    CDK Global has been hit with a proposed privacy class action in Illinois federal court by a Florida resident who says the auto software company unlawfully failed to protect his and other individuals' personal information from being exposed in a ransomware attack the company detected last week.

  • June 24, 2024

    Julie Chrisley To Be Resentenced, But Convictions Stand

    The Eleventh Circuit on Friday upheld the tax evasion and fraud convictions of former reality TV stars Todd and Julie Chrisley, but ordered a Georgia federal judge to resentence Julie Chrisley after finding that the judge failed to fully explore her discrete role in the $36 million scheme.

  • June 24, 2024

    Chase, Florida Law Firm Settle $100K Wire Theft Suit

    JPMorganChase Bank NA and Florida-based law firm Frank A. Rubino Esq. PA have agreed to settle a suit accusing the financial services giant of negligence by failing to prevent a $100,000 payment that a client mistakenly sent a fraudster.

  • June 24, 2024

    $12.8M Deal Ending Some Chiquita MDL Claims Gets Approval

    A Florida federal judge said Monday he would sign off on a proposed $12.8 million settlement between Chiquita Brands International Inc. and some of the victims suing the banana company over its funding of Colombian paramilitary groups.

  • June 24, 2024

    Trump Mar-A-Lago Case Is Unlawfully Funded, Fla. Judge Told

    An attorney defending Donald Trump against the federal government's accusation that he illegally retained classified documents at Mar-a-Lago after leaving the White House in 2021 told a Florida judge Monday the criminal indictment should be dismissed against the former president, saying that the case isn't lawfully funded.

  • June 24, 2024

    IT Co. Settles Fired Worker's Anxiety Leave Retaliation Suit

    An information technology company has agreed to settle a former worker's suit claiming the company pushed him out of a job after he took medical leave to treat his anxiety that developed from working 16-hour days, according to a Florida federal court filing.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices Send 3 US Trustee Fee Cases Back To Lower Courts

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday vacated three appellate court decisions ordering refunds to debtors who had overpaid U.S. Trustee's Office fees under a previous fee structure and remanded the cases for further adjudication after resolving the issue earlier this month.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices To Assess Reach Of ADA To Ex-Workers' Benefit Suits

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday accepted a retired Florida firefighter's request that it decide whether former employees can lodge discrimination suits under the Americans with Disabilities Act related to post-employment benefits.

  • June 21, 2024

    Real Estate Recap: Distressed Deals, Housing Hurdles, Infill

    Catch up on this week's key state developments from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including tips for guiding distressed office deals, the latest intel from Harvard University's Joint Center for Housing Studies, and how one U.S. city has been a magnet for federal funding of brownfield projects.

  • June 21, 2024

    Insurer Targets Ex-Employee Over $47M Plant Financing Claim

    British insurance company Beazley has targeted a former employee in Florida federal court, accusing the former underwriter of exposing it to a $47 million arbitration claim in Brazil after he improperly inked a deal with a reinsurer as part of an ill-fated financing pact for a thermoelectric plant.

  • June 21, 2024

    Nike Misled Investors On Sales Strategy, Ore. Class Suit Says

    Nike and two executives were hit with a proposed class action lawsuit in Oregon federal court over securities law violations, with a Florida-based pension fund alleging stock value declined as the shoe corporation continued to mislead investors on the success of a change in sales strategy.

  • June 21, 2024

    Trump Says AG Can't Appoint Prosecutor In Mar-A-Lago Case

    Attorney General Merrick Garland did not have the statutory authority to promote an independent special counsel to prosecute former President Donald Trump over his allegedly illegal retention of classified documents at his Mar-a-Lago estate, Trump's attorneys told a Florida federal judge Friday.

  • June 21, 2024

    11th Circ. Backs Fla. Agency Win In Ex-Warden's FMLA Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit refused Friday to reinstate a former warden's lawsuit accusing the Florida Department of Corrections of transferring and demoting her because she was nearing 60 and took six months of leave, saying she failed to connect the dots to show the agency was motivated by bias.

  • June 21, 2024

    Chase Didn't Stop Fraudulent Transfers, Fla. Biz Owner Says

    Chase Bank has been sued in Miami-Dade County state court, accused of negligence by a business owner who alleged that the bank failed to stop more than $445,000 that was drained from his accounts in a series of fraudulent wire transfers earlier this year.

  • June 21, 2024

    Off The Bench: ACC-FSU Rematch, Supreme Win For Fla. Tribe

    In this week's Off The Bench, the next round of venue tug-of-war begins between the Atlantic Coast Conference and Florida State University, the U.S. Supreme Court hands Florida and the Seminole Tribe a lucrative gaming win, and Roger Goodell and Jerry Jones defend the NFL's handling of its Sunday Ticket package.

  • June 21, 2024

    Kona Ice Nabs $533K In Toppings Dispenser Patent Trial

    A Florida federal jury has come to the conclusion that a small shaved ice franchise from Boca Raton owes the Kona Ice brand a little over half a million dollars for infringing a patent covering a "liquid toppings dispensing system."

  • June 21, 2024

    Wrong Address Dooms Removal Relief Bid, 11th Circ. Finds

    The Eleventh Circuit won't reverse the long-ago removal in absentia of a Honduran woman who missed her removal hearing, citing the Board of Immigration Appeals' finding that she'd provided an inaccurate address to receive notice of the hearing.

  • June 21, 2024

    11th Circ. Rules Hotel Operator Liable For Wages As Employer

    A hotel operator exercised enough control over a front desk worker to be his employer and is therefore liable for minimum wage and overtime, the Eleventh Circuit ruled, also noting that a lower court erred in calculating the damages.

  • June 21, 2024

    Feds Seek To Nix Atty's Charges As 2nd Atty Heads To Prison

    Prosecutors moved Friday to dismiss charges against a Georgia attorney for fraudulently obtaining federal pandemic-relief loans meant for businesses, with the pending dismissal — based on her completion of a pretrial diversion program — coming after a Florida attorney and alleged accomplice received a prison sentence of more than six years.

  • June 21, 2024

    AAA, Worker End Sex Bias Suit After Missed Eclipse Day Depo

    AAA and a former insurance agent told a Florida federal court Friday that they've settled the ex-employee's gender discrimination lawsuit amid a fight over how much his attorney owes the organization for missing a deposition because he was traveling to see April's solar eclipse.

  • June 21, 2024

    Justices Strengthen Jury Trial Rights For Stiffer Sentences

    The constitutional rights to due process and trial by jury extend to a pivotal prong of a prominent sentencing enhancement for recidivism, the U.S. Supreme Court held in a Friday decision that casts doubt on many incarcerations and promises to reshape future trials.

  • June 20, 2024

    Panama Claims Immunity In Construction Firm's Countersuit

    Panama has urged a Florida federal court to reject a Miami businessman's countersuit alleging that a previous settlement bars the enforcement of a $4.8 million arbitral award against him and his construction firm, saying that it has immunity and that no such agreement existed.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • The Challenges SEC's Climate Disclosure Rule May Face

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    Attorneys at Debevoise examine potential legal challenges to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's new climate-related disclosure rule — against which nine suits have already been filed — including arguments under the Administrative Procedure Act, the major questions doctrine, the First Amendment and the nondelegation doctrine.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: March Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from consumer fraud to employment — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including coercive communications with putative class members and Article III standing at the class certification stage.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

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    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • 11th Circ. FMLA Ruling Deepens Divide Over Causation

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent ruling in Lapham v. Walgreen distinguishes the circuit as the loudest advocate for the but-for causation standard for assessing Family and Medical Leave Act retaliation claims, though employers in other jurisdictions may encounter less favorable standards and the U.S. Supreme Court will likely have to address the circuit split eventually, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Litigation Inspiration: A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

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    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • Fla. Bankruptcy Ruling Is Cautionary Tale For Debt Collectors

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    A Florida bankruptcy court recently rejected the assertion that a debt purchaser was entitled to enforce a debt not correctly listed on the debtor's bankruptcy schedules, and the sanctions imposed provide a stark reminder on due diligence in debt collection practices, say Deborah Kovsky-Apap and Stefanie Jackman at Troutman Pepper.

  • Series

    Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

  • The Road Ahead For Florida's Drug Importation Program

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    Though the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Florida's drug importation program in January, a series of hurdles — including requisite buy-in from Canada — and potential legal challenges must be addressed before importation can begin, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • High Court Social Media Speech Ruling Could Implicate AI

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    In Moody v. NetChoice and NetChoice v. Paxton, the U.S. Supreme Court is considering whether certain state laws can restrict content moderation by social media platforms, but the eventual decision could also provide insight into whether the first amendment protects artificial intelligence speech, say Joseph Meadows and Quyen Dang at GRSM50.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Forget Everything You Know About IRAC

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    The mode of legal reasoning most students learn in law school, often called “Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion,” or IRAC, erroneously frames analysis as a separate, discrete step, resulting in disorganized briefs and untold obfuscation — but the fix is pretty simple, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Race Bias Defense Considerations After 11th Circ. Ruling

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    In Tynes v. Florida Department of Juvenile Justice, the Eleventh Circuit affirmed that the McDonnell Douglas test for employment discrimination cases is merely an evidentiary framework, so employers relying on it as a substantive standard of liability may need to rethink their litigation strategy, says Helen Jay at Phelps Dunbar.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

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