Government Contracts

  • July 05, 2024

    How Reshaped Circuit Courts Are Faring At The High Court

    Seminal rulings from the U.S. Supreme Court's latest term will reshape many facets of American society in the coming years. Already, however, the rulings offer glimpses of how the justices view specific circuit courts, which have themselves been reshaped by an abundance of new judges.

  • July 05, 2024

    Breaking Down The Vote: The High Court Term In Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court's lethargic pace of decision-making this term left the justices to issue a slew of highly anticipated and controversial rulings during the term's final week — rulings that put the court's ideological divisions on vivid display. Here, Law360 takes a data dive into the numbers behind this court term.

  • July 05, 2024

    High Court Flexes Muscle To Limit Administrative State

    The U.S. Supreme Court's dismantling of a 40-year-old judicial deference doctrine, coupled with rulings stripping federal agencies of certain enforcement powers and exposing them to additional litigation, has established the October 2023 term as likely the most consequential in administrative law history.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Sharpest Dissents From The Supreme Court Term

    The U.S. Supreme Court's session ended with a series of blockbuster cases that granted the president broad immunity, changed federal gun policy and kneecapped administrative agencies. And many of the biggest decisions fell along partisan lines.

  • July 05, 2024

    5 Moments That Shaped The Supreme Court's Jan. 6 Decision

    When the high court limited the scope of a federal obstruction statute used to charge hundreds of rioters who stormed the Capitol, the justices did not vote along ideological lines. In a year marked by 6-3 splits, what accounts for the departure? Here are some moments from oral arguments that may have swayed the justices.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Funniest Moments Of The Supreme Court's Term

    In a U.S. Supreme Court term teeming with serious showdowns, the august air at oral arguments filled with laughter after an attorney mentioned her plastic surgeon and a justice seemed to diss his colleagues, to cite just two of the term's mirthful moments. Here, we look at the funniest moments of the term.

  • July 05, 2024

    Self-Driving Tech Co. Disputes Chinese Military Designation

    Lidar technology firm Hesai has urged a Washington, D.C., federal judge to overturn its designation as a Chinese military company, saying the Pentagon had failed to show it had any connection to China's military industrial base.

  • July 05, 2024

    DOJ Asks High Court To Review Nixed Bid-Rigging Conviction

    The U.S. Department of Justice has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review the overturning of a former Contech executive's bid-rigging conviction, saying the appeals court was wrong to focus on a supplier relationship between companies that also compete for contracts.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Firms That Won Big At The Supreme Court

    This U.S. Supreme Court term featured high-stakes oral arguments on issues including gerrymandering, abortion and federal agency authority, and a hot bench ever more willing to engage in a lengthy back-and-forth with advocates. Here's a look at the law firms that argued the most cases and how they fared.

  • July 03, 2024

    HHS Scores Early Win In Boehringer's Medicare Pricing Suit

    A Connecticut federal judge on Wednesday sided with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in Boehringer Ingelheim's challenge to a new Medicare drug price negotiation program, rejecting the pharmaceutical company's claim that the program is unconstitutional.

  • July 03, 2024

    JV Questioned Over Small Biz's Role Can't Upend $50M Deal

    A joint venture couldn't upend a $50 million IT contract, failing to convince the U.S. Government Accountability Office that a federal officer was wrong to question what its protégé member brought to the table during an early stage of bidding, the GAO has said.

  • July 03, 2024

    Sandy Cleanup Workers Agree To End Prevailing Wage Suit

    Five workers told a New Jersey federal judge they agreed to put to rest their suit against a disaster recovery company and a waterfront building company claiming they should have been paid prevailing wages while clearing roadways and waterways in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.

  • July 03, 2024

    Appeals Board Tosses Revived License Breach Dispute

    The Civilian Board of Contract Appeals has again tossed a dispute, previously revived by the Federal Circuit, alleging the U.S. Food and Drug Administration breached a software company's end-user license agreement, saying it lacks jurisdiction to enforce the agreement.

  • July 03, 2024

    Chevron Reversal May Shift Contract Dispute Outcomes

    The U.S. Supreme Court's upending of its 40-year-old Chevron doctrine, which deferred to federal agencies' interpretation of ambiguous legislation, could reverberate outside the statutory realm and give government contractors an edge while contesting agencies' read of contract language, experts say.

  • July 03, 2024

    After Chevron Deference: What Lawyers Need To Know

    This term, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Chevron deference, a precedent established 40 years ago that said when judges could defer to federal agencies' interpretations of law in rulemaking. Here, catch up with Law360's coverage of what is likely to happen next.

  • July 02, 2024

    Contractor Says Chevron Reversal 'Upends' Navy Deal Suit

    A military contractor seeking to undo the U.S. Navy's contract with a competitor for support services at European bases has told the Federal Circuit that the U.S. Supreme Court's recent overturning of the so-called Chevron doctrine "upends" the underlying decision in its suit.

  • July 02, 2024

    Challenge To Army Container Corrective Action Dismissed

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims on Monday swept aside a challenge to the U.S. Army Materiel Command's revamped Army shipping container project.

  • July 02, 2024

    'Idle' Ga. Election Officials Holding Up Suit, Judge Told

    Lawyers for an array of plaintiffs challenging portions of Georgia's 2021 election overhaul law attempted with one hand to convince a federal judge Tuesday not to scuttle their claims before a trial, while with the other urged the court to put the suit on ice until "dysfunctional" elections officials get their act together.

  • July 02, 2024

    Gov't Urged To Gauge TransDigm Deals' Effect On Defense Biz

    Three Democratic lawmakers are pressing the U.S. Department of Defense and antitrust enforcers to review an aerospace company's recent acquisition of two other companies, citing antitrust and price gouging concerns.

  • July 02, 2024

    Alaska Village Hits Army Corps With Gold Mine Permit Suit

    The Native Village of Dot Lake is asking an Alaska federal judge to throw out a permit the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued for an open pit gold mine Kinross Gold Corp. and Peak Gold LLC are developing near the Yukon border.

  • July 01, 2024

    High Court's 1-2 Punch Sets Up Long-Standing Regs For KO

    By ending its term with a stinging combination against federal agencies, the U.S. Supreme Court's conservative bloc left behind a bruised bureaucracy and a regulatory system that's now vulnerable to a barrage of incoming attacks.

  • July 01, 2024

    Guatemala Says $31M Award Can't Be Enforced In U.S.

    Guatemala told a D.C. federal court on Friday that litigation filed by a construction and engineering firm to enforce $31 million in arbitral awards against it must be tossed, saying the underlying arbitration and dispute are entirely Guatemalan in nature.

  • July 01, 2024

    Military Store Service Says Blind Vendors Must Follow Process

    The U.S. Department of Defense asked a federal judge on Monday to dismiss a lawsuit filed by blind entrepreneurs accusing the military of ignoring a law that requires officials to prioritize businesses owned by blind people, arguing that the merchants should have completed the administrative process first.

  • July 01, 2024

    GAO Says CMS Treated Bids On $34M Security Deal Differently

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has sustained a protest over a $34 million Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services task order for information technology security services, saying CMS treated the credentials of key employees differently for the protester and the awardee.

  • July 01, 2024

    Lack Of 'Diligence' Dooms Conn. IT Co.'s Contract Suit

    A Connecticut state judge has thrown out a lawsuit brought by an information technology company that accused a rival of poaching a municipal contract with the city of Hamden in violation of a subcontracting agreement, writing that the parties did not file a joint schedule by a court-ordered deadline.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Lessons From Ex-Vitol Trader's FCPA Conviction

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    The recent Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and money laundering conviction of former Vitol oil trader Javier Aguilar in a New York federal court provides defense takeaways on issues ranging from the definition of “domestic concern” to jury instruction strategy, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Saying What Needs To Be Said

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    Edward Arnold and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth Shaw examine three recent decisions that delve into the meaning and effect of contractual releases, and demonstrate the importance of ensuring that releases, as written, do what the parties intend.

  • Insurance Types That May Help Cos. After Key Bridge Collapse

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    Following the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge, businesses that depend on the bridge, the Port of Baltimore and related infrastructure for shipment and distribution of cargo should understand which common types of first-party insurance coverage may provide recoveries for financial losses, say Bert Wells and Richard Lewis at Reed Smith.

  • Exploring An Alternative Model Of Litigation Finance

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    A new model of litigation finance, most aptly described as insurance-backed litigation funding, differs from traditional funding in two key ways, and the process of securing it involves three primary steps, say Bob Koneck, Christopher Le Neve Foster and Richard Butters at Atlantic Global Risk LLC.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Unwitting Disclosure, Agency Deference

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    Roke Iko at MoFo examines two U.S. Court of Federal Claims decisions highlighting factors to consider before filing a protest alleging Procurement Integrity Act violations, and a decision from the U.S. Government Accountability Office about the capacity of an agency to interpret its own solicitation terms.

  • Global Bribery Probes Are Complicating FCPA Compliance

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    The recent rise in collaboration between the U.S. Department of Justice and foreign authorities in bribery enforcement can not only affect companies' legal exposure as resolution approaches vary by country, but also the decision of when and whether to disclose Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations to the DOJ, say Samantha Badlam and Catherine Conroy at Ropes & Gray.

  • Series

    Teaching Yoga Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Being a yoga instructor has helped me develop my confidence and authenticity, as well as stress management and people skills — all of which have crossed over into my career as an attorney, says Laura Gongaware at Clyde & Co.

  • A Vision For Economic Clerkships In The Legal System

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    As courts handle increasingly complex damages analyses involving vast amounts of data, an economic clerkship program — integrating early-career economists into the judicial system — could improve legal outcomes and provide essential training to clerks, say Mona Birjandi at Data for Decisions and Matt Farber at Secretariat.

  • Pay-To-Play Deal Shows Need For Strong Compliance Policies

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, through its recent settlement with Wayzata, has indicated that it will continue stringent enforcement of the pay-to-play rule, so investment advisers should ensure strong compliance policies are in place to promptly address potential violations as the November elections approach, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • Opinion

    Feds' Biotech Enforcement Efforts Are Too Heavy-Handed

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent actions against biotech companies untether the Anti-Kickback Statute from its original legislative purpose, and threaten to stifle innovation and undermine patient quality of care, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • E-Discovery Quarterly: Recent Rulings On Text Message Data

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    Electronically stored information on cellphones, and in particular text messages, can present unique litigation challenges, and recent court decisions demonstrate that counsel must carefully balance what data should be preserved, collected, reviewed and produced, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • 'Fat Leonard' Case Shows High Bar For Rescinding Guilty Plea

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    Prosecutors’ recent move in the “Fat Leonard” bribery case, supporting several defendants’ motions to withdraw their guilty pleas, is extremely unusual – and its contrast with other prosecutions demonstrates that the procedural safeguards at plea hearings are far from enough, says Sara Kropf at Kropf Moseley.

  • How New Rule Would Change CFIUS Enforcement Powers

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    Before the May 15 comment deadline, companies may want to weigh in on proposed regulatory changes to enforcement and mitigation tools at the disposal of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, including broadened subpoena powers, difficult new mitigation timelines and higher maximum penalties, say attorneys at Venable.

  • Series

    Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

  • Mid-2024 FCA Enforcement And Litigation Trends To Watch

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    Reviewing notable False Claims Act trends and enforcement efforts in the last year and a half reveals that healthcare is a key enforcement priority for the U.S. Department of Justice, and the road ahead may bring clarification on Anti-Kickback Statute causation and willfulness standards, along with increased focus on private equity, cybersecurity and self-disclosure, say attorneys at Epstein Becker.

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