Government Contracts

  • June 27, 2024

    Madigan Judge Doesn't Want Trial To Slip After Justices Rule

    The Illinois federal judge overseeing the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act case against former Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan said Thursday he was hesitant to delay an October trial after the U.S. Supreme Court removed prosecutors' ability to go after state officials for accepting gratuities.

  • June 27, 2024

    Boeing Settles Suit Claiming NC Fund Ransomed Plane Parts

    The Boeing Co. and the private investment firm it accused of forcing a new supply contract under false pretenses before raising prices for aircraft parts by more than 300% have agreed to settle their dispute, according to a new notice filed in North Carolina federal court.

  • June 27, 2024

    Ex-Deputy Mayor Of Newark Pleads Guilty In Bribery Scheme

    A former deputy mayor of Newark, New Jersey, has admitted in federal court that he conspired with two business owners in a bribery scheme involving the acquisition and redevelopment of various city-owned properties, federal prosecutors said.

  • June 27, 2024

    Bradley Arant Adds Former Wells Fargo Associate GC In DC

    Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has hired a former associate general counsel for both Wells Fargo and Bank of America, who previously served as a U.S. attorney in the Central District of California and most recently as a Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP partner.

  • June 26, 2024

    Claims Court Says USAID Wrongly Cut JV From $800M Deal

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims has ruled that the U.S. Agency for International Development was wrong to rescind a joint venture's slot on an $800 million support services procurement after one of its members was suspended from federal contracting.

  • June 26, 2024

    Moms For America Sues Biden Admin Over Vax Liability Law

    Conservative nonprofit Moms for America has sued the Biden administration over a law that shields companies from COVID-19 vaccine injury lawsuits, saying the law is unconstitutional because it circumvents judicial review and violates fundamental rights, including due process and trial by jury.

  • June 26, 2024

    Justices Chide 5th Circ. In Biden Social Media Case

    The Fifth Circuit relied on "clearly erroneous" facts and an overgeneralized view of standing when it ordered the Biden administration to stop working with social media platforms to combat COVID-19 and election misinformation, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday as it threw out a challenge to the government's actions.

  • June 26, 2024

    After Covering For Ex, Man Gets 53 Months For PPP Scheme

    A Georgia man who pled guilty to being a key player in an $11 million pandemic loan fraud ring was hit with a 53-month prison term Wednesday, a sentence that wasn't helped after a federal judge found he lied on the stand testifying for his ex-wife and co-conspirator at her trial earlier this year.

  • June 26, 2024

    Julian Assange Freed After Judge Accepts US Plea Deal

    Julian Assange returned to his native Australia on Wednesday hours after a federal judge in the Northern Mariana Islands accepted his plea deal with the U.S. Department of Justice and sentenced him to time served for conspiring to disclose national security information.

  • June 26, 2024

    GAO Backs BAE Protest Over $12B Missile Support Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has backed a BAE Systems unit's protest over a $12 billion contract to support the U.S. Air Force's nuclear missile office, saying the Air Force didn't properly assess whether awardee Guidehouse's labor plans were realistic.

  • June 26, 2024

    Supreme Court Bribery Ruling Limits Government's 'Arsenal'

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision Wednesday limiting the reach of a federal bribery law has removed a "novel" tool that prosecutors employed in a wide range of public corruption cases and could result in fewer prosecutions of state and local officials, experts say.

  • June 26, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Says No Fees For HID Global In Patent Suit

    The Federal Circuit has backed a U.S. Court of Federal Claims finding that HID Global Corp. can't have attorney fees after being let out of patent litigation brought by Giesecke & Devrient, but it affirmed on different grounds.

  • June 26, 2024

    Judge Won't Free Texas Officials From Lengthy Detention Suit

    A Texas federal judge refused to toss four migrants' claims that state officials detained them for longer than allowed, saying they have pled enough misconduct that, if true, would show the officers were aware they were holding detainees for weeks past their release date.

  • June 26, 2024

    Miami-Dade Cites Animal Harm In Aquarium Eviction Action

    Miami-Dade County has sued to evict an aquarium from a government-owned waterfront site following reports that the operator didn't clean and maintain the 70-year-old facility well enough and repeatedly failed to care for dolphins, manatees and other animals held at the theme park.

  • June 26, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Denies Contractor's $37M Tax Reimbursement Bid

    A U.S. State Department armed security contractor is not entitled to $37 million in reimbursement tied to tax payments to the Afghan government because the contractor's parent company, not the company itself, incurred the costs associated with the payments, the Federal Circuit said Wednesday.

  • June 26, 2024

    Justices Say Bribery Law Doesn't Criminalize Gratuities

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday narrowed the scope of a federal bribery law frequently used in corruption cases against local officials, in a 6-3 ruling in favor of a former Indiana mayor who argued the law only criminalizes quid pro quo bribery and not rewards given after an official act.

  • June 26, 2024

    High Court Axes Challenge To Biden Admin's Social Media Work

    The U.S. Supreme Court wiped out a Fifth Circuit order prohibiting the Biden administration and several federal agencies from working with social media platforms to combat the spread of misinformation Wednesday, finding the states and individuals challenging the collaboration don't have standing to sue.

  • June 25, 2024

    Judge Likely To Block Medical Record Co.'s Anti-Bot CAPTCHAs

    A Maryland federal judge appeared ready to enjoin electronic medical records company PointClickCare from restricting nursing home analytics company Real Time Medical Systems' automated access to its online repositories Tuesday, potentially taking an early crack at defining the 21st Century Cures Act's data sharing provisions.

  • June 25, 2024

    Pappas Restaurants 'Invented' Causes In Houston Airport Suit

    The city of Houston told a state appeals court Tuesday that it should be shielded from a suit filed by Pappas Restaurants that alleges its procurement process caused Pappas to unfairly lose a 2023 contract with the William P. Hobby Airport because the contract for airport concessions did not require the city to spend any money.

  • June 25, 2024

    Texas Appeals Court Reverses Dallas Transit Contractor's Win

    A Texas appeals court has revived a subcontractor's lawsuit against a company that oversees the Dallas Area Rapid Transit Authority's services for people with disabilities, saying this week the subcontractor's allegations were strong enough to withstand a motion to dismiss.

  • June 25, 2024

    Dems Seek 'Honest Evaluation' Of New ICBM Program

    Thirteen Democrats, including the co-chairs of the Congressional Nuclear Weapons and Arms Control Working Group, are calling for an "honest evaluation" of the U.S. Air Force's new intercontinental ballistic missile program due to cost overruns.

  • June 25, 2024

    Ex-SEPTA Surveillance Unit Head Gets 37 Months For Bribery

    A former director of video surveillance for a Pennsylvania transportation authority was sentenced Monday for his role in a bribery and extortion scheme in which he exchanged inside information for thousands of dollars, concert tickets and a future job.

  • June 25, 2024

    GAO Won't Hear Protest Over Canceled DOD Sole-Source Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has rejected a protest over the Defense Health Agency canceling a company's contract to instead seek competitive bids, saying the company ultimately sought the award of a sole-source deal, a position the watchdog won't support.

  • June 25, 2024

    IRS Apologizes To Hedge Fund Founder Over Leaked Tax Data

    The IRS issued an extraordinary public apology Tuesday to hedge fund founder and billionaire Ken Griffin for the leak of his and others' tax information to the media by a former contractor who admitted to stealing the returns of thousands of wealthy individuals, including former President Donald Trump.

  • June 25, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Revives Class Action Against Feds' Visa Fraud Sting

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday revived an Indian citizen's proposed class action to recover tuition payments to a fake university the U.S. Department of Homeland Security set up to catch visa fraudsters, saying the lower court wrongly determined it lacked jurisdiction.

Expert Analysis

  • Why Timely Gov't Contractor Registration Renewal Is Key

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    The U.S. Government Accountability Office's recent decision in TLS Joint Venture makes clear that a lapse in System for Award Management registration, no matter how brief, renders a government contractor ineligible for a negotiated procurement, so submit renewals with plenty of time to spare, say attorneys at Haynes Boone.

  • Inside OMB's Update On Race And Ethnicity Data Collection

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    The Office of Management and Budget's new guidelines for agency collection of data on race and ethnicity reflect societal changes and the concerns of certain demographics, but implementation may be significantly burdensome for agencies and employers, say Joanna Colosimo and Bill Osterndorf at DCI Consulting.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • GSA's Carbon-Free Power Plan: Tips For Electricity Suppliers

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    The U.S. General Services Administration's recent request for information concerning its intent to acquire a large amount of carbon pollution-free electricity over the next decade in the PJM Interconnection region offers key insights for companies interested in becoming electric power suppliers to federal government agencies, say Shaunna Bailey and Nicholas Dugdale at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Interpretation And Jurisdiction

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    Edward Arnold and Sarah Barney at Seyfarth examine three decisions by the U.S. Court of Federal Claims that show the importance of knowing who your contracting partner is, addressing patent ambiguities in a solicitation prior to award and keeping basic contract principles in mind when evaluating performance obligations.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • New Proposal Signals Sharper Enforcement Focus At CFIUS

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    Last week's proposed rule aimed at broadening the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States' enforcement authority over foreign investments and increasing penalties for violations signals that CFIUS intends to continue expanding its aggressive monitoring of national security issues, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • The Pros And Cons Of NIST's Proposed March-In Framework

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    Recent comments for and against the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s proposed guidance on march-in rights — which permit the government to seize federally funded patents — highlight how the framework may promote competition, but could also pose a risk to contractors and universities, say Nick Lee and Paul Ragusa at Baker Botts.

  • What Minority Biz Law Ruling Could Mean For Private DEI

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    A Texas federal court’s recent decision to strike down key provisions of the Minority Business Development Act illustrates the wide-reaching effects of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2023 Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard decision across legal contexts, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • When Trade Secret Protection And Nat'l Security Converge

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    The Trump administration's anti-espionage program focused on China is over, but federal enforcement efforts to protect trade secrets and U.S. national security continue, and companies doing business in high-risk jurisdictions need to maintain their compliance programs to avoid the risk of being caught in the crosshairs of an investigation, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • How Export Controls Are Evolving To Address Tech Security

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    Recently proposed export control regulations from the U.S. Department of Commerce are an opportunity for stakeholders to help pioneer compliance for the increasing reliance on the use of outsourced technology service providers, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Opinion

    New Mexico Fire Victims Deserve Justice From Federal Gov't

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    Two years after the largest fire in New Mexico's history — a disaster caused by the U.S. government's mismanagement of prescribed burns — the Federal Emergency Management Agency must remedy its grossly inadequate relief efforts and flawed legal interpretations that have left victims of the fire still waiting for justice, says former New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas.

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