Immigration

  • June 26, 2024

    NC Bar Rips Immigration Atty's 'Absurd' Disbarment Appeal

    The North Carolina State Bar urged a state appellate court not to entertain an immigration attorney's appeal of his disbarment, stating that his appeal featured arguments that came too late and otherwise relied on a fallacious and "incoherent" reading of disciplinary regulations with "absurd results."

  • June 25, 2024

    Expired Diversity Visas Can't Be Processed, DC Circ. Says

    The D.C. Circuit on Tuesday reversed several lower court orders requiring the U.S. Department of State to process applications for diversity visas for fiscal years 2020 and 2021 after the deadline, finding the district court lacked the authority to order such relief.

  • June 25, 2024

    9th Circ. Reopens Jehovah's Witness Preacher's Asylum Bid

    The Ninth Circuit on Tuesday reopened a Jehovah's Witness preacher's petition seeking asylum after he was attacked and threatened by Salvadoran gang members for regularly preaching on the streets, finding his religion would be a central reason for the attacks, even without the gang's motive for financial gain through extortion.

  • June 25, 2024

    Texas' Challenge To Biden Admin. Asylum Rule Survives

    A Texas federal judge ruled Tuesday that he got it right when he declined the federal government's attempt to end the state's suit challenging a Biden administration rule that broadens immigration officers' power over the asylum system, saying Texas did enough to withstand a motion to dismiss.

  • June 25, 2024

    2nd Circ. Affirms 5-Year Sentence For Impostor Immigration Atty

    A Connecticut woman sentenced to five years in federal prison for stealing money from vulnerable victims by pretending to be an immigration attorney can't undo her plea deal or lessen the roughly $368,000 she was ordered to pay in restitution, the Second Circuit has ruled.

  • June 25, 2024

    Feds Stonewalling Immigration Fee Record Request, Suit Says

    A civil rights group in Boston filed suit Tuesday to force the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to hand over records about how the government decides requests to waive fees for people seeking immigration protections.

  • June 25, 2024

    Immigration Org.'s Attys Can Be In Union, NLRB Official Says

    Attorneys at a nonprofit providing immigration legal services may remain in a voluntarily recognized union bargaining unit, a National Labor Relations Board regional director concluded, saying the attorneys are not supervisors who are excluded from unionizing under federal labor law.

  • June 25, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Revives Class Action Against Feds' Visa Fraud Sting

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday revived an Indian citizen's proposed class action to recover tuition payments to a fake university the U.S. Department of Homeland Security set up to catch visa fraudsters, saying the lower court wrongly determined it lacked jurisdiction.

  • June 24, 2024

    Feds Reach $34M Deal Over Canceled Deportation Flights

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. General Services Administration and an aviation company have struck a $34.4 million settlement ending litigation over canceled deportation flights, according to a filing at the U.S. Civilian Board of Contract Appeals.

  • June 24, 2024

    NJ Atty Suspended 3 Years For Unauthorized Practice Of Law

    A New Jersey attorney has been suspended from practicing law for three years after she continued to represent clients and mishandle sensitive matters while she was suspended for similar conduct in 2019, according to a New Jersey Supreme Court order.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices' Removal Notice Decision Unwinds 3 Migrants' Wins

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent endorsement of multipart removal notices resulted in the Monday vacatur of three circuit court decisions offering migrants another chance at fighting deportation after receiving notices that initially omitted important information about their removal hearings.

  • June 24, 2024

    Duane Morris Appoints New Immigration Law Chair

    Philadelphia-based Duane Morris LLP announced on Friday the appointment of business immigration partner Ted J. Chiappari as chair of its immigration division, part of its employment, labor, benefits and immigration practice.

  • June 21, 2024

    DOL Says Union's Farm Wage Challenge Too Late

    The U.S. Department of Labor has pushed back against a challenge to rules introduced in 2022 that a Washington union said are depressing farmworkers' wages, telling a federal judge Friday that the union should have objected during the rule-making period.

  • June 21, 2024

    NCAA Teams May Suffer Without Int'l Student Pay Regs

    The historic $2.77 billion settlement to address college athletes' alleged lost compensation on name, image and likeness deals could have an adverse effect on university team rosters if the federal government fails to level the playing field for international athletes.

  • June 21, 2024

    Wrong Address Dooms Removal Relief Bid, 11th Circ. Finds

    The Eleventh Circuit won't reverse the long-ago removal in absentia of a Honduran woman who missed her removal hearing, citing the Board of Immigration Appeals' finding that she'd provided an inaccurate address to receive notice of the hearing.

  • June 21, 2024

    Justices Won't Allow Citizens To Contest Denied Spouse Visas

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that Americans do not have a constitutional right to challenge the U.S. Department of State's denial of spousal visa applications, rejecting a woman's bid to review the department's rejection of her Salvadoran husband's visa.

  • June 20, 2024

    Logistics Cos. Face Skilled Worker Visa Misuse Class Action

    A pair of logistics companies in the United States face a proposed worker class action alleging they misled prospective employees in Mexico about purported engineering roles that, in reality, were menial labor.

  • June 20, 2024

    Judge Flags Iowa's Blocked Immigration Law In Texas Battle

    The Texas federal judge overseeing the Biden administration's challenge to a state law authorizing the deportation of noncitizens urged the parties to inform the Fifth Circuit of an order blocking Iowa's similar law, anticipating an Eighth Circuit review of Iowa's defeat.

  • June 20, 2024

    Staffing Co. To Pay $558K To End DOJ Immigrant Bias Probe

    The U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday that a staffing firm will pay nearly $558,000 to end an investigation into its hiring practices that found it deterred non-U.S. citizens with permission to work in the country from applying for open job opportunities.

  • June 20, 2024

    Spanish Fluency Goal Defeats H-2B Tutor Application

    The U.S. Department of Labor refused to grant a woman's H-2B visa application to hire a foreign Spanish-language tutor for her children, ruling that the goal to attain Spanish fluency was at odds with the temporary nature of the nonimmigrant visa program.

  • June 20, 2024

    Transport Co.'s Missing Worksite Info Dooms H-2B Request

    An agricultural transportation company's efforts to hire 28 truckers through the H-2B seasonal visa program were doomed by a job order that lacked specific information on the truckers' driving routes, according to a recent U.S. Department of Labor decision.

  • June 20, 2024

    Texas Says DACA Challenge Withstands Mifepristone Ruling

    Texas has fired back against the Biden administration's claim that the U.S. Supreme Court's recent blockbuster abortion-drug mifepristone ruling undermines the Lone Star State's standing to challenge the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, telling the Fifth Circuit that the appellate court "has held — repeatedly — that Texas has standing in this context."

  • June 20, 2024

    Fla. Calls Abortion Drug Case Irrelevant To Migrant Parole Suit

    Florida has rebuffed the Biden administration's efforts to use a high court ruling maintaining access to the abortion drug mifepristone to nix challenges to its migrant parole policies, telling the Eleventh Circuit that the healthcare case is unrelated to the immigration one.

  • June 18, 2024

    Texas Atty Pares Border Phone Search Suit To Just APA Claim

    A Texas attorney has significantly trimmed a lawsuit over cellphone searches at the border, dismissing claims he brought under the First and Fourth Amendments but leaving intact allegations the practice represents a violation of the federal Administrative Procedure Act.

  • June 18, 2024

    Feds Say Discovery Order Exposes Migrants To Retaliation

    The U.S. Department of Labor is urging a Mississippi federal court to reconsider ordering the disclosure of informants' identities in an investigation into a fish farm's labor practices, saying the May order exposed the informants, who are also migrant employees at the farm, to possible retaliation.

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Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Being An Equestrian Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Beyond getting experience thinking on my feet and tackling stressful situations, the skills I've gained from horseback riding have considerable overlap with the skills used to practice law, particularly in terms of team building, continuing education, and making an effort to reset and recharge, says Kerry Irwin at Moore & Van Allen.

  • 4 Ways To Refresh Your Law Firm's Marketing Strategy

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    With many BigLaw firms relying on an increasingly obsolete marketing approach that prioritizes stiff professionalism over authentic connection, adopting a few key communications strategies to better connect with today's clients and prospects can make all the difference, say Eric Pacifici and Kevin Henderson at SMB Law.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Nonprecedential, Unreasonable, Scope

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    James Tucker at MoFo examines three recent decisions showing that while the results of past competitions may inform bid strategy, they are not determinative; that an agency's award may be deemed unreasonable if it ignores available information; and that a protester may be right about an awardee's noncompliance but still lose.

  • Fears About The End Of Chevron Deference Are Overblown

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    While some are concerned about repercussions if the U.S. Supreme Court brings an end to Chevron deference in the Loper and Relentless cases this term, agencies and attorneys would survive just fine under the doctrines that have already begun to replace it, say Daniel Wolff and Henry Leung at Crowell & Moring.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Opinion

    Expanded Detention Will Not Solve Immigration Challenges

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    The recently defeated bipartisan border package included provisions that would increase funding for detention, a costly distraction from reforms like improved adjudication and legal representation that could address legitimate economic and public safety concerns at much lower cost, say Alexandra Dufresne and Kyle Wolf at Cornell University.

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