International Trade

  • June 20, 2024

    Menendez Jury Sees Slides Lowell Presented To SDNY Brass

    Sen. Robert Menendez's lawyers grilled a witness in his bribery trial Thursday about a meeting in which Abbe Lowell, the politician's ex-lawyer, tried to convince U.S. Attorney Damian Williams not to indict Menendez — but were stymied by flurries of objections.

  • June 20, 2024

    Study Shows Compliance With ICSID Damages Awards Is High

    Countries have voluntarily complied with or inked settlements in connection with the overwhelming majority of damages awards issued by the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes while voluntary compliance with costs awards has been somewhat more elusive, according to an ICSID study published this week.

  • June 20, 2024

    Attys In Chiquita Case Say Victims Can't Proceed Together

    A long-standing rift among plaintiffs' attorneys for victims of violence committed by paramilitary groups funded by Chiquita Brands International Inc. has reached a fever pitch, as attorneys have now told the court they cannot proceed together in a second bellwether trial of the multidistrict litigation set to start next month.

  • June 20, 2024

    Sunset Review Redo Counter To Basic Principles, Says Judge

    A U.S. Court of International Trade judge on Thursday rebuffed a Turkish steel producer's call to reverse a sunset review that maintained its anti-dumping duties, a move he said would fray the procedural web that gives sense to trade remedies.

  • June 20, 2024

    Rockwell Wins Treble Damages After $4M Gray Market Verdict

    A Delaware federal judge agreed Tuesday to award treble damages to Rockwell Automation, which is behind the Allen-Bradley brand of factory equipment, bringing its total recovery to nearly $9 million after a jury found it was owed more than $4 million in August.

  • June 20, 2024

    PPG Sues Westlake In Delaware Over $707M Brazil Liability

    Pittsburgh global paint supplier PPG Industries Inc. has sued chemical supplier Westlake Corp. in Delaware's Court of Chancery, accusing Westlake of breaching a 2012 agreement to accept liabilities related to a cargo ship fire that happened off the coast of Brazil in 1998.

  • June 20, 2024

    Ex-BVI Ports Director Gets 9 Years For Drug Smuggling Plot

    A Florida federal judge on Thursday sentenced the former managing director of the British Virgin Islands Ports Authority to just over 9 years in prison for participating in a scheme involving a former BVI premier to move tons of Colombian cocaine through BVI ports to the United States.

  • June 20, 2024

    Feds Delay Thai Refrigerator Probe To Check Industry Support

    The U.S. Department of Commerce on Thursday delayed its investigation into whether certain refrigerator exporters from Thailand are dumping their products in the U.S. to verify if the investigation has the support of the majority of the domestic industry.

  • June 18, 2024

    Menendez Request On Pet Case Was Unique, Aide Testifies

    When Sen. Robert Menendez allegedly directed an aide to tell a U.S. attorney that an alleged bribe-giver facing prosecution deserved "all due process," it was the only criminal case Menendez ever singled out that way in their years working together, the aide testified Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2024

    Legal Clinic Can't Weigh In On Motorcycle Co.'s Mexico Claim

    A Canadian appeals court has rejected a public interest legal clinic's request to opine on the test for procedural unfairness as U.S.-based Vento Motorcycles looks to revive its claim blaming Mexico for destroying its business by slapping what it says are unfair tariffs on its bikes.

  • June 18, 2024

    Panama Gov't Faces New Proceedings Over Canal Expansion

    The Panamanian government is facing two new arbitration proceedings brought by two shareholders of a contractor over efforts to expand the Panama Canal, according to a statement issued Monday by the Panama Canal Authority.

  • June 18, 2024

    ITC To Eye Samsung Loss In LCD Patent Suit Against Rival

    The U.S. International Trade Commission decided Monday to review several issues in a judge's decision that cleared Manufacturing Resources International Inc. in a suit by Samsung accusing it of infringing LCD digital display patents.

  • June 18, 2024

    Circumvention Finding Twisted Trade Statute, Pipe Co. Says

    The U.S. Department of Commerce contorted its statutory authority to foist circumvention duties on a Vietnam-based pipe producer that has already cleared dumping and unfair subsidy allegations, the company said in a motion calling to roll back the levies.

  • June 18, 2024

    Steel Co. Says Cambodian Hangers Are Skirting Hefty Duties

    A domestic hanger manufacturer accused its foreign rivals of skirting steep antidumping and countervailing steel tariffs by shipping hangers made with Chinese and Vietnamese steel from Cambodia.

  • June 18, 2024

    Foley Hoag Hires Former DOJ Fraud Section Deputy

    Foley Hoag LLP has hired a former deputy chief of the U.S. Department of Justice's Fraud Section, who will work with the firm's white collar crime and government investigations practice in Washington, D.C.

  • June 17, 2024

    Cocoa Trade Case May Hinge On Justices' Mifepristone Ruling

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent narrow ruling on standing in a case over access to the abortion medication mifepristone may figure prominently in upcoming oral arguments in a dispute involving imported cocoa allegedly harvested via forced child labor before the U.S. Court of International Trade, a judge said Monday.

  • June 17, 2024

    Huawei Slams Netgear's 'Tenuous' RICO Case

    Huawei has responded to a racketeering and antitrust case from a major U.S. maker of Wi-Fi routers by calling it "rife with tenuous legal and factual claims" and comparing its reworking of patent infringement allegations to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission's failed antitrust case against Qualcomm.

  • June 17, 2024

    Repeat Violations Land Ore. Forwarder Export Denial Order

    An Oregon-based package forwarder has lost export privileges just days before clearing a three-year probationary period for alleged unlicensed rifle scope exports, after an audit revealed 176 new violations, the U.S. Department of Commerce announced Monday.

  • June 17, 2024

    Commerce Says Trimmed Garlic Covered By Fresh Garlic Duty

    The U.S. Department of Commerce ruled Monday that peeled and trimmed garlic is covered by an anti-dumping duty order on fresh Chinese garlic.

  • June 17, 2024

    Justices Reject Dispute Over $3.1B South Korean Military Deal

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Monday to consider the scope of commercial activities in a case brought by a brokerage firm fighting the loss of a $3.1 billion South Korean military satellite deal.

  • June 14, 2024

    Fed Limits Bank's Fintech Dealings Over Risk Concerns

    The Federal Reserve filed a cease-and-desist order against an Arkansas bank Friday requiring it to obtain federal and state approval before partnering with any fintech companies going forward after the agency identified risk management deficiencies in recent safety and compliance exams.

  • June 14, 2024

    G7 Takes Aim At China Trade For Prolonging Ukraine War

    The Group of Seven leaders' statement Friday promised additional measures on top of sanctions announced by the U.S. and partner countries this week should Beijing continue selling sensitive technology to Russia.

  • June 14, 2024

    FAA Probes Fake Titanium Docs From Boeing Supplier

    The Federal Aviation Administration said Friday that it's investigating whether certain Boeing Co. jets were manufactured with titanium components that may have been sold to the plane maker with falsified authenticity documents.

  • June 14, 2024

    US Urges 5th Circ. To Back $2M Tax Bill For Tire Imports

    The Fifth Circuit should overturn a lower court's ruling that a Houston truck company was not an importer responsible for nearly $2 million in excise taxes on tires it bought from a Chinese manufacturer, the U.S. told the Fifth Circuit on Friday.

  • June 14, 2024

    Brazil Telecom Tower Investor Sues For Delaware Litigation

    A Mexican investor with a small equity position in a Delaware limited partnership that builds and operates telecommunications towers in Brazil sued the partnership in Delaware's Court of Chancery Friday for injunctive relief, seeking to ensure that any litigation with the partnership or its affiliates takes place in the First State and not Brazil.

Expert Analysis

  • The Art Of Asking: Leveraging Your Contacts For Referrals

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    Though attorneys may hesitate to ask for referral recommendations to generate new business, research shows that people want to help others they know, like and trust, so consider who in your network you should approach and how to make the ask, says Rebecca Hnatowski at Edwards Advisory.

  • Series

    Being An Equestrian Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Beyond getting experience thinking on my feet and tackling stressful situations, the skills I've gained from horseback riding have considerable overlap with the skills used to practice law, particularly in terms of team building, continuing education, and making an effort to reset and recharge, says Kerry Irwin at Moore & Van Allen.

  • Deciding What Comes At The End Of WTO's Digital Tariff Ban

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    Companies that feel empowered by the World Trade Organization’s recent two-year extension of the ban on e-commerce tariffs should pay attention to current negotiations over what comes after the moratorium expires, as these agreements will define standards in international e-commerce for years to come, say Jan Walter, Hannes Sigurgeirsson and Kulsum Gulamhusein at Akin Gump.

  • Georgia's Foreign Lobbying Bill Is Not A FARA Copycat

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    Though a recently passed bill in Georgia aims to mirror the transparency goals of the federal Foreign Agents Registration Act by imposing state-specific disclosure requirements for foreign lobbyists, the legislation’s broad language and lack of exemptions could capture a wider swath of organizations, say attorneys at Holtzman Vogel.

  • 4 Ways To Refresh Your Law Firm's Marketing Strategy

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    With many BigLaw firms relying on an increasingly obsolete marketing approach that prioritizes stiff professionalism over authentic connection, adopting a few key communications strategies to better connect with today's clients and prospects can make all the difference, say Eric Pacifici and Kevin Henderson at SMB Law.

  • Opinion

    Seafarer Detention Under Ship Pollution Law Must Have Limits

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    The U.S. Coast Guard should reinstate limits on the number of days that foreign crew members may be forced to remain in the country while the U.S. Department of Justice investigates alleged violations of shipping pollution laws, in order to balance legitimate enforcement interests and seafarer welfare, say attorneys at Blank Rome.

  • Assigning Liability In Key Bridge Collapse May Be Challenging

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    In the wake of a cargo ship's collision with Baltimore's Key Bridge last month, claimants may focus on the vessel's owners and the agencies responsible for the design and maintenance of the bridge — but allocating legal liability to either private or governmental entities may be difficult under applicable state and federal laws, says Clay Robbins at Wisner Baum.

  • Data Protection Steps To Consider After Biden Privacy Order

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    A recent White House executive order casts a spotlight on the criticality of securing sensitive content communications, presenting challenges and necessitating a recalibration of practices, especially for lawyers, says Camilo Artiga-Purcell at Kiteworks.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • New Proposal Signals Sharper Enforcement Focus At CFIUS

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    Last week's proposed rule aimed at broadening the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States' enforcement authority over foreign investments and increasing penalties for violations signals that CFIUS intends to continue expanding its aggressive monitoring of national security issues, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Traversing The Web Of Nonjudicial Grievance Mechanisms

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    Attorneys at Covington provide an overview of how companies can best align their environmental and human rights compliance with "hard-law" requirements like the EU's recently approved Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive while also navigating the complex global network of existing nonjudicial grievance mechanisms.

  • Analyzing New EU Measure To Prevent Reexports To Russia

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    Niels Ersbøll, Alexander Italianer and Laura Beuls at Arnold & Porter offer a comprehensive overview of the European Union's new rule requiring export agreements to contain a clause prohibiting the reexport of goods to Russia, and discuss what companies should do to ensure compliance.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • When Trade Secret Protection And Nat'l Security Converge

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    The Trump administration's anti-espionage program focused on China is over, but federal enforcement efforts to protect trade secrets and U.S. national security continue, and companies doing business in high-risk jurisdictions need to maintain their compliance programs to avoid the risk of being caught in the crosshairs of an investigation, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

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