Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • July 18, 2024

    Insurer Settles Coverage Row Over Wash. Day Care Sex Abuse

    Following a contested nearly $25 million settlement agreement, an insurance coverage dispute arising from the molestation of children at an Olympia, Washington, day care center has been resolved, a Washington federal court announced Thursday.

  • July 18, 2024

    5th Circ. Upholds Tossing Of Ship Captain's Toxic Injury Suit

    A former offshore supply vessel captain, who claims chemicals aboard caused his cancer and kidney failure, must sue his U.S. employer in England, the Fifth Circuit has ruled, saying the employment contract's forum selection clause is enforceable even after considering Louisiana's law which largely prohibits such clauses.

  • July 18, 2024

    Miner Seeks Atty Fees After 4th Circ. DOL Judges Ruling

    A former miner urged the Fourth Circuit to approve approximately $21,000 in attorney fees in his case seeking benefits for his black lung disease, saying he has been unable to reach a settlement with an engineering company that challenged the appointment of two U.S. Department of Labor administrative law judges.

  • July 18, 2024

    Texas Psychiatric Patient's Head Trauma Suit Can Go Forward

    A Texas appeals court has revived a man's claims against a doctor who he said failed to diagnose and treat a head injury while he was a psychiatric patient, saying the trial court was wrong to find his allegations had no basis in fact.

  • July 18, 2024

    Shelter Ignored Workers' Sex Abuse Of Migrant Kids, Feds Say

    The nation's largest housing provider for unaccompanied migrant children for years turned a blind eye to its employees raping, sexually abusing and harassing children in its care, the U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday in announcing its lawsuit filed in Texas federal court.

  • July 18, 2024

    GSK, Boehringer Face Jurors Again On Zantac Cancer Claims

    GlaxoSmithKline and Boehringer Ingelheim returned to Illinois state court Thursday, where they face separate juries to defend against Zantac users' claims that the drug caused them to develop cancer.

  • July 18, 2024

    FordHarrison Accused Of Terrorizing Conn. Library Workers

    Multistate employment law firm FordHarrison LLP has been dragged into existing feuds between a Connecticut library and two of its employees, with new state court lawsuits accusing the firm of misrepresenting state law and inflicting emotional distress by demanding the employees retract claims allegedly made at a public hearing.

  • July 18, 2024

    Woman Can't Get Rectal Cancer Med Mal Suit Reinstated

    A Texas appeals court won't let a woman revive her claims that a doctor with Houston Methodist Willowbrook failed to diagnose her rectal cancer, saying she failed to preserve for appeal the issue of whether the court properly granted a 30-day extension to file an amended expert report.

  • July 18, 2024

    Attorney, Businessman Acquitted Of Crash Report Scheme

    A Michigan federal judge on Tuesday cited insufficient evidence and ordered the cancellation of jury convictions against a lawyer and a medical business owner in an alleged scheme to obtain unreleased police crash reports illegally and use the reports to solicit clients.

  • July 18, 2024

    Colo. Injury Firm, Insurer End Bad Faith Suit

    Two months after a Colorado personal injury firm and insurer settled a dispute over coverage of litigation costs, the two sides have agreed to dismiss the firm's lawsuit against a former firm attorney accused of trying to steal its entire class action department.

  • July 18, 2024

    NJ Sen. President Settles Suit Over Filing After Client Died

    New Jersey State Senate President Nick Scutari settled a malpractice case this week with a woman who claimed that he botched a personal injury case on behalf of her brother by waiting until months after her brother had died to file suit.

  • July 18, 2024

    Girardi Denied Bid To Delay Client Theft Trial To October

    A California federal judge rejected disgraced lawyer Tom Girardi's motion to have his closely watched wire fraud trial moved to October from its current August start date, determining that he was unable to provide a genuine reason as to why proceedings should be pushed back two months.

  • July 18, 2024

    Ga. Mineral Co. Can't Nab Win In Row Over Talc Suit Coverage

    A Georgia federal judge declined to grant a win to a mineral products company trying to compel a Travelers unit to defend it against an underlying suit claiming that it supplied asbestos-containing talc products.

  • July 18, 2024

    Colo. Judge Ends Voter Intimidation Case Midtrial

    A Colorado federal judge on Thursday put an abrupt end to a bench trial in a lawsuit accusing members of a 2020 election denier group of illegal voter intimidation, concluding there was not enough evidence to back up the claims brought by voting rights groups.

  • July 17, 2024

    'Vanderpump' Revenge Porn Drama Upped As Sandoval Sues

    "Vanderpump Rules" star Tom Sandoval lodged claims against his ex-girlfriend and fellow Bravo star Ariana Madix alleging she invaded his right to privacy by accessing explicit FaceTime videos of him and another cast member on his phone without permission.

  • July 17, 2024

    'Inflammatory' Atty Statement Axes $11M Stanley Injury Verdict

    A Missouri appellate court has tossed an $11 million jury verdict in a suit alleging a Stanley Black & Decker unit caused a man to lose an eye due to a defective staple gun, saying plaintiff's counsel made improper "inflammatory" references to Stanley as a "billion-dollar company."

  • July 17, 2024

    Hazing Trial Plaintiffs' Claims Too General, Northwestern Says

    Northwestern University pushed back against a group of players accusing the institution of negligence in a football program hazing scandal, arguing the allegations are too general because they do not include the specific instances of hazing each plaintiff experienced.

  • July 17, 2024

    Pharma Co. Slams Magistrate's Venue Report In Opioid Suit

    A pharmaceuticals distributor is objecting to an Oklahoma federal magistrate judge's recent recommendation to deny as moot the company's bid to dismiss a Cherokee Nation suit accusing it of flooding tribal communities with opioids, saying the case shouldn't be sent to state court.

  • July 17, 2024

    NY Judge Sends Suits Over Indianapolis FedEx Shooting To SC

    Firearms manufacturer American Tactical Inc has persuaded a New York Judge to send to South Carolina lawsuits that victims of an April 2021 mass shooting at an Indianapolis FedEx facility filed to accuse the company of recklessly advertising a 60-round magazine used in the attack.

  • July 17, 2024

    'Rust' Fiasco Shows Harm Of Gatekeeping Evidence, Attys Say

    The dismissal of Alec Baldwin's criminal charges in the "Rust" movie shooting serves as a "glaring example" of how a case can tumble off the rails when prosecutors decide whether evidence is valuable to the defense, experts say.

  • July 17, 2024

    Investigator Argues Mogul's Hacked Data Aren't Trade Secrets

    A private investigator accused of taking part in an international hacking conspiracy targeting airline mogul Farhad Azima is looking for a win after a protracted discovery battle, saying Azima has failed to prove the allegedly stolen data contained his trade secrets.

  • July 17, 2024

    Hospital Trims Its Insulin Pen Claims Against Novo Nordisk

    A Connecticut hospital and Novo Nordisk Inc. have agreed to dismiss several of the pharmaceutical giant's corporate entities from a suit seeking to make the company pay for the hospital's $1 million settlement from an underlying patient class action over allegedly defective insulin pens the firm made.

  • July 17, 2024

    Target Hit With Suit After Texas Infant Died In Baby Lounger

    Target and the makers of an infant lounger have been hit with a product liability lawsuit from a Texas couple who allege their 7-month-old daughter died after falling out of the device.

  • July 17, 2024

    Jerry Jones, Alleged Daughter Spar As Contract Trial Nears

    With the start of trial in Jerry Jones' contract breach lawsuit approaching in Texas federal court, the woman claiming to be the Dallas Cowboys owner's daughter denied his accusations of perjury, destruction of evidence and failing to provide documents ordered by the court.

  • July 17, 2024

    Ohio Justices Enforce $30M Police Brutality Judgment

    The Ohio Supreme Court on Wednesday ordered the city of East Cleveland to pay upwards of $30 million to satisfy a judgment in favor of a man who won a jury verdict finding that police officers wrongfully detained him and caused serious injuries in the process.

Expert Analysis

  • Del. Bankruptcy Ruling Will Give D&O Insureds Nightmares

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    In Henrich v. XL Specialty Insurance, the Delaware Bankruptcy Court recently found that a never-served qui tam claim had been "brought" before a D&O policy's retroactive date, thereby eliminating coverage, and creating a nightmare scenario for directors and officers policyholders facing whistleblower claims, says David Klein at Pillsbury.

  • A Crucial Step In Mediation: Preparing Your Client

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    Most U.S. courts have adopted standing orders that require all civil cases be mediated before being assigned to a trial calendar, so any lawyer involved in civil disputes must be knowledgeable about mediation — including the vital but often underutilized skill of preparing clients before mediation begins, says Jeffrey Lasky at Miles Mediation & Arbitration.

  • Prejudicial Evidence Takeaways From Trump Hush Money Trial

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    The Manhattan District Attorney's Office's prosecution and conviction of former President Donald Trump on 34 felony counts provides a lesson on whether evidence may cause substantial unfair prejudice, or if its prejudicial potential is perfectly fair within the bounds of the law, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Opinion

    No Matter The Purdue Ruling, Mass Tort Reform Is Needed

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    The U.S. Supreme Court will soon issue its opinion in the bankruptcy of Purdue Pharma LP, and regardless of the outcome, it’s clear legal and policy reforms are needed to address the next mass tort, says William Organek at Baruch College.

  • After A Brief Hiccup, The 'Rocket Docket' Soars Back To No. 1

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    The Eastern District of Virginia’s precipitous 2022 fall from its storied rocket docket status appears to have been a temporary aberration, as recent statistics reveal that the court is once again back on top as the fastest federal civil trial court in the nation, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • Recruitment Trends In Emerging Law Firm Frontiers

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    BigLaw firms are facing local recruitment challenges as they increasingly establish offices in cities outside of the major legal hubs, requiring them to weigh various strategies for attracting talent that present different risks and benefits, says Tom Hanlon at Buchanan Law.

  • Series

    Glassblowing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    I never expected that glassblowing would strongly influence my work as an attorney, but it has taught me the importance of building a solid foundation for your work, learning from others and committing to a lifetime of practice, says Margaret House at Kalijarvi Chuzi.

  • 3 Surprising Deposition Dangers Attorneys Must Heed

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    Attorneys often do not think of discovery as a particularly risky phase of litigation, but counsel must closely heed some surprisingly strict and frequently overlooked requirements before, during and after depositions that can lead to draconian consequences, says Nate Sabri at Perkins Coie.

  • How Associates Can Build A Professional Image

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    As hybrid work arrangements become the norm in the legal industry, early-career attorneys must be proactive in building and maintaining a professional presence in both physical and digital settings, ensuring that their image aligns with their long-term career goals, say Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners and Estelle Winsett at Estelle Winsett Professional Image Consulting.

  • Insurers Have A Ch. 11 Voice Following High Court Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in Truck Insurance Exchange v. Kaiser Gypsum — which reaffirmed a broad definition of "party in interest" — will give insurers, particularly in mass tort Chapter 11 bankruptcies, more opportunity to protect their interests and identify problems with reorganization plans, says George Singer at Holland & Hart.

  • Justices' Bump Stock Ruling Skirted Deference, Lenity Issues

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    Despite presenting a seemingly classic case on agency deference, the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling last week in Garland v. Cargill did not mention the Chevron doctrine, and the opinion also overlooked whether agency interpretations of federal gun laws should ever receive deference given that they carry criminal penalties, say Tess Saperstein and John Elwood at Arnold & Porter.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

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    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Confronting The Psychological Toll Of Personal Injury Law

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    Personal injury lawyers advocate for clients who have experienced trauma, loss and life-altering injuries, but these cases can have an emotional impact on attorneys themselves — so it is crucial to address these challenges proactively and openly, and normalize the conversation around mental health in the legal profession, says Lisa Lanier at Lanier Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

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