Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • July 08, 2024

    Elite Gymnastics Camp To Pay $8M For Coach's Sex Assaults

    A Pennsylvania training camp previously popular with aspiring Olympic gymnasts has agreed to pay a former student $8 million to settle allegations that it hired a coach who sexually assaulted her when she was 14 despite knowing about previous abuse allegations, her attorneys announced Monday.

  • July 08, 2024

    Judge's Error Reverses Med Mal Atty Sanctions, Panel Rules

    A Pennsylvania Superior Court ruled Monday that a Philadelphia trial court erred by imposing sanctions on counsel in a long-running medical malpractice suit against a hospital, saying sanctions can't be based on a broad courtwide policy attempting to speed up medical malpractice cases.

  • July 08, 2024

    Ex-Worker Under Protective Order Stole Gym's Name, Suit Says

    A former mixed martial arts gym employee with a protective order against him for threatening his boss and several other workplace misconduct violations stole the company's name to use in opening a competing gym and luring co-workers and clients away, according to a suit filed Friday in Colorado state court.

  • July 08, 2024

    Purdue Creditors Look To Sue Sacklers After Justices' Ruling

    The official committee of unsecured creditors in the Chapter 11 case of drugmaker Purdue Pharma asked a New York bankruptcy judge on Monday for standing to bring actions against members of the Sackler family that own the company after the U.S. Supreme Court torpedoed a precarious settlement among the parties.

  • July 08, 2024

    Carriers Seek Reimbursement For $1.3B LNG Explosion

    Insurers for the owner of a liquefied natural gas export facility have accused a bankrupt contractor and its joint-venture partners of negligently causing a costly explosion by failing to implement proper safety instrumentation, seeking reimbursement for their coverage payments after the facility owner said it lost over $1.3 billion.

  • July 08, 2024

    Biggest Michigan Decisions Of 2024: A Midyear Report

    Michigan's appellate courts started off the year with notable labor and no-fault insurance opinions, allowing retaliation claims from a whistleblower's friends who didn't make any complaints themselves, and clarifying confusing auto insurance coverage changes after legislative reforms. Here is a look at some of the biggest decisions in Michigan so far this year.

  • July 08, 2024

    Clinic Is Liable For Botched Operations, NC Justices Told

    A patient claiming she underwent unnecessary and flawed spinal surgery at the hands of a defrocked doctor urged the North Carolina Supreme Court on Friday to let stand a ruling that the practice where he worked and its physicians can be held liable for her treatment.

  • July 08, 2024

    Patient Says Health System Shares Data With Meta, Google

    Henry Ford Health in Michigan was hit with a proposed class action Friday alleging that it shares patients' private health information with third parties such as Meta and Google by allowing the companies to have tracking software embedded in its website, including its patient portal, where sensitive health information is uploaded.

  • July 08, 2024

    Celebrity Cruises Morgue Cooler Breakdown Suit Advances

    A Florida federal judge on Monday denied a bid by Celebrity Cruises Inc. to prevail in a suit alleging that it mishandled the body of a passenger who died during a cruise, saying there's a dispute about when the cruise line should have known that its morgue cooler had malfunctioned.

  • July 08, 2024

    9th Circ. Revives Liability Claims In Welder's Injury Suit

    The Ninth Circuit has mostly reversed a summary judgment order that freed a hoist maker and maintenance company from product liability and negligence claims by a welder who was injured when the hoist came loose and struck him in the head.

  • July 08, 2024

    Rite Aid Says Elixir Buyer In Contempt Over Liability Dispute

    Bankrupt pharmacy chain Rite Aid has asked a New Jersey bankruptcy judge to find the purchaser of its prescription benefits subsidiary in contempt, saying the buyer is defying his orders by refusing to assume $200 million of the subsidiary's liabilities.

  • July 08, 2024

    Anesthesia Death Trial Ends In $15.4M Award For Estate

    A Connecticut anesthesiology group must pay $15.4 million to the estate of a 57-year-old woman who suffered cardiorespiratory collapse and severe brain damage during a routine 20-minute outpatient gastroenterology imaging procedure and died a month later in an intensive care unit, a state superior court jury has decided.

  • July 08, 2024

    Ex-OneTaste Staffer Says Atty Forced Her To Play The Victim

    A former employee of sexual wellness company OneTaste is suing her former lawyer, saying he conspired with the FBI to present her as a victim of a forced labor conspiracy while she maintains she was not.

  • July 08, 2024

    Baldwin's Role As 'Rust' Producer Off Limits At Trial

    A New Mexico state judge ruled Monday that Alec Baldwin's role as a producer of "Rust" is irrelevant to the involuntary manslaughter charges he faces in the shooting death of the movie's cinematographer, cutting off a key theory of the prosecution's case against the actor on the eve of his trial.

  • July 08, 2024

    Boeing To Plead Guilty, Pay $243M Fine In DOJ 737 Max Deal

    Boeing has agreed to plead guilty to conspiring to defraud safety regulators about the 737 Max 8's development, avoiding a criminal trial over a pair of deadly crashes in 2018 and 2019, according to a U.S. Department of Justice court filing late Sunday.

  • July 05, 2024

    Feds Slam Girardi's 'Last Ditch Effort' To Block Evidence

    Prosecutors urged a California federal judge Friday to reject Tom Girardi's bid to suppress evidence collected without a search warrant from his law firm's bankruptcy trustee, arguing that the trustee had control of the firm's books and records and had the power to voluntarily produce the documents for the disgraced attorney's wire fraud case.

  • July 05, 2024

    Fired Atty Only Gets $9K From $1.5M Motorcycle Crash Deal

    A Connecticut appeals court ruled Friday that $9,000 was a fair payment to a personal injury attorney who was fired after he quickly obtained a $100,000 settlement offer for a motorcyclist who eventually settled for $1.5 million.

  • July 05, 2024

    How Reshaped Circuit Courts Are Faring At The High Court

    Seminal rulings from the U.S. Supreme Court's latest term will reshape many facets of American society in the coming years. Already, however, the rulings offer glimpses of how the justices view specific circuit courts, which have themselves been reshaped by an abundance of new judges.

  • July 05, 2024

    Breaking Down The Vote: The High Court Term In Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court's lethargic pace of decision-making this term left the justices to issue a slew of highly anticipated and controversial rulings during the term's final week — rulings that put the court's ideological divisions on vivid display. Here, Law360 takes a data dive into the numbers behind this court term.

  • July 05, 2024

    High Court Flexes Muscle To Limit Administrative State

    The U.S. Supreme Court's dismantling of a 40-year-old judicial deference doctrine, coupled with rulings stripping federal agencies of certain enforcement powers and exposing them to additional litigation, has established the October 2023 term as likely the most consequential in administrative law history.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Sharpest Dissents From The Supreme Court Term

    The U.S. Supreme Court's session ended with a series of blockbuster cases that granted the president broad immunity, changed federal gun policy and kneecapped administrative agencies. And many of the biggest decisions fell along partisan lines.

  • July 05, 2024

    5 Moments That Shaped The Supreme Court's Jan. 6 Decision

    When the high court limited the scope of a federal obstruction statute used to charge hundreds of rioters who stormed the Capitol, the justices did not vote along ideological lines. In a year marked by 6-3 splits, what accounts for the departure? Here are some moments from oral arguments that may have swayed the justices.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Funniest Moments Of The Supreme Court's Term

    In a U.S. Supreme Court term teeming with serious showdowns, the august air at oral arguments filled with laughter after an attorney mentioned her plastic surgeon and a justice seemed to diss his colleagues, to cite just two of the term's mirthful moments. Here, we look at the funniest moments of the term.

  • July 05, 2024

    Ex-BigLaw Atty Settles Defamation Suit Against Influencer

    Former Greenberg Traurig LLP partner Allan A. Kassenoff has settled his $150 million defamation lawsuit against the social media influencer Kassenoff claims ruined his life by lying about his nightmarish divorce.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Firms That Won Big At The Supreme Court

    This U.S. Supreme Court term featured high-stakes oral arguments on issues including gerrymandering, abortion and federal agency authority, and a hot bench ever more willing to engage in a lengthy back-and-forth with advocates. Here's a look at the law firms that argued the most cases and how they fared.

Expert Analysis

  • How Purdue Pharma High Court Case May Change Bankruptcy

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s upcoming ruling in Purdue Pharma may be the death of most third-party releases in Chapter 11 cases, and depending on the decision’s breadth, could have much more far-reaching effects on the entire bankruptcy system, say Brian Shaw and David Doyle at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Calif. High Court Ruling Has Lessons For Waiving Jury Trials

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    The California Supreme Court’s recent decision in TriCoast Builders v. Fonnegra, denying relief to a contractor that had waived its right to a jury trial, shows that litigants should always post jury fees as soon as possible, and seek writ review if the court denies relief from a waiver, say Steven Fleischman and Nicolas Sonnenburg at Horvitz & Levy.

  • SC Ruling Reinforces All Sums Coverage Trend

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    A South Carolina state court's recent ruling in Covil v. Pennsylvania National is the latest in a series of decisions, dating back to the 2016 New York Court of Appeals ruling in Viking Pump, that reject insurers' pro rata allocation argument, further supporting that all sums coverage is required whenever a loss could be covered under a policy in any other year, say Raymond Mascia and Thomas Dupont at Anderson Kill.

  • Del. Supreme Court Insurance Ruling Aids In Defining 'Claim'

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    The recent Delaware Supreme Court decision in Zurich v. Syngenta, finding that a presuit letter did not constitute a claim for insurance purposes, sets out a three-factor test to help policyholders distinguish when a demand rises to the level of a claim, says Lara Langeneckert at Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • Securing A Common Understanding Of Language Used At Trial

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    Witness examinations in the Georgia election interference case against former President Donald Trump illustrate the importance of building a common understanding of words and phrases and examples as a fact-finding tool at trial, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Opinion

    5th Circ. NFL Disability Ruling Turns ERISA On Its Head

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    The Fifth Circuit's March 15 ruling in Cloud v. NFL Player Retirement Plan upheld the plan's finding that an NFL player was not entitled to reclassification because he couldn't show changed circumstances, which is contrary to the goal of accurate Employee Retirement Income Security Act claims processing, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • Opinion

    Proposed MDL Management Rule Needs Refining

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    Proponents of the recently proposed Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 16.1 believe it may enhance efficiency in multidistrict litigation proceedings if adopted, but there are serious concerns that it could actually hinder plaintiffs' access to justice through the courts — and there are fundamental flaws that deserve our attention, says Ashleigh Raso at Nigh Goldenberg.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Needs Regulating To Meet Ethics Standards

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    Third-party litigation funding can provide litigants with access to the legal system, but, as recent cases show, the funding agreements carry the potential for exploitation and may conflict with core aspects of the attorney-client relationship, making the need for a balanced regulation self-evident, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • Ala. Frozen Embryo Ruling Creates Risks for Managed Care Orgs

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    The Alabama Supreme Court's decision in LePage v. Center for Reproductive Medicine last month, declaring that frozen embryos count as children, has not only upended the abortion debate but also raised questions for managed care organizations and healthcare providers that provide, offer or facilitate fertility treatment nationwide, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

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