Project Finance

  • May 14, 2024

    5 Takeaways From FERC's Grid Planning Policy Overhaul

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's sweeping revision of its regional transmission planning policies will completely transform how U.S. grid projects are planned and paid for, but the agency's muscular approach will invite plenty of compliance and legal challenges. Here are five key takeaways from the rule finalized by FERC on Monday.

  • May 14, 2024

    Apache Investors Get First OK On $65M Deal In Drilling Suit

    A U.S. magistrate judge has given the first green light to a $65 million settlement resolving a lawsuit against oil and gas company Apache Corp. filed by investors alleging they were deceived by promises of a potentially lucrative drilling project that ultimately led to a $3 billion write-down when it went bust.

  • May 14, 2024

    Energy Cos. Don't Have To Clarify Financier Takeover Claims

    The founders of several Houston energy companies don't have to clarify a state court complaint in which they accuse an equity shareholder and several companies he manages of a scheme to take over their companies and steal millions in their membership interests, a Texas state judge has ruled.

  • May 14, 2024

    DC Circ. Upholds EPA's Renewable Fuel Standards

    A divided D.C. Circuit panel upheld on Tuesday the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's renewable fuel standards for 2020, 2021 and 2022, rejecting renewable fuel producers' claims the standards are too low, and petroleum refiners' contentions that they are too high.

  • May 14, 2024

    9th Circ. Rejects Bid For Full Rehearing In Oak Flat Dispute

    The Ninth Circuit on Tuesday rejected a bid by an Apache nonprofit for a full judge en banc rehearing in an effort to block a copper mining company from destroying an Indigenous religious site in central Arizona known as Oak Flat, setting up the case for a U.S. Supreme Court appeal.

  • May 13, 2024

    Charter, Altice Drop Some Areas From Rural Funding Plans

    The Federal Communications Commission said Charter and Altice had withdrawn from their plans to use FCC rural deployment funding to build out high-speed internet in several areas, incurring federal penalties.

  • May 13, 2024

    Bottling Co. Ends $2.7M Suit Against Fake Loan Brokers

    A North Carolina bottling company has ended its lawsuit accusing two loan brokers of lying about their connection to a wealthy lender who ended up being a fraudster who took nearly $3 million from a business and its financier.

  • May 13, 2024

    Feds' Fiber First Policy Slows Deployment, Report Says

    Most states' plans to deploy broadband with funds from the National Telecommunications and Information Administration's BEAD Program have room for improvement, according to a new report from a technology think tank.

  • May 13, 2024

    FERC Powers Up Major Rewrite Of Grid Planning Policy

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Monday finalized a long-awaited overhaul of how major electric transmission projects are planned and paid for, with the agency's Republican commissioner claiming his Democratic colleagues are unlawfully favoring clean energy at the expense of state electricity authority.

  • May 10, 2024

    $1B LNG Claim Won't Be Paused For $15B Keystone Case

    Canada has lost its bid to suspend a politically sensitive billion-dollar claim over a stymied liquefied natural gas facility in Québec until a critical jurisdictional issue in a parallel $15 billion claim against the U.S. challenging the cancelation of the Keystone XL pipeline is decided.

  • May 10, 2024

    Pa. Commission Had Right To Deny Grid Project, 3rd Circ. Told

    The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission called on the Third Circuit on Friday to reinstate its rejection of a transmission power project approved by regional grid operator PJM Interconnection, arguing a federal district court wrongly deemed the decision unconstitutional.

  • May 10, 2024

    Enviro Groups Say Colo. Rule Gives Many Polluters An Out

    Environmental justice groups say a Colorado regulation that was supposed to require on-site monitoring of air pollution in disproportionately impacted communities allows many polluters to get out of the requirement by paying one-time fees, according to a brief filed in a lawsuit challenging the rule.

  • May 09, 2024

    Senate Approves FAA Reauthorization Bill

    The U.S. Senate on Thursday passed legislation reauthorizing the Federal Aviation Administration's safety and airport improvement programs in a package that includes hiring thousands more air traffic controllers and inspectors, among other things.

  • May 09, 2024

    3 Engineering Firms Sued Over Pittsburgh Bridge Collapse

    Three engineering firms share responsibility with the city of Pittsburgh for the collapse of the Fern Hollow Bridge in 2022, a new lawsuit alleges, claiming the engineers failed to flag how dangerous and deteriorated the bridge was for years before it fell.

  • May 09, 2024

    Red States, Electric Co-Ops Challenge EPA Power Plant Rules

    Twenty-seven Republican-led states and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association called on the D.C. Circuit Thursday to unravel the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's new source performance standards for greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel-fired electric generating units.

  • May 09, 2024

    GE Dropped From Louisiana Factory Contamination Suit

    A Louisiana federal judge has dropped General Electric from property owners' suit alleging widespread contamination caused by a now-closed manufacturing facility, finding an earlier merger by a subsidiary did not make the company a liable successor.

  • May 08, 2024

    BIA Tells 8th Circ. Energy Co. Can't Revive Lease Suit

    The U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs has asked the Eighth Circuit to uphold a North Dakota federal judge's dismissal of Prima Exploration Inc.'s oil and gas lease termination suit, saying the lower court correctly dismissed the case for failure to exhaust administrative remedies.

  • May 08, 2024

    6th Circ. Questions FERC's Moves On Ohio Utility Grid Perk

    A Sixth Circuit panel on Wednesday questioned the role of a rate perk given to transmission companies for choosing to join a regional transmission organization as it weighed the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's decision to yank the incentive for several Ohio utilities while preserving it for others.

  • May 08, 2024

    Mont. Tribe Says Feds Must Sign Law Enforcement Contract

    The Northern Cheyenne Tribe has accused the U.S. government of failing to provide the tribe with adequate law enforcement services, urging a Montana federal judge to order it to sign a tribal self-determination contract with an annual funding amount of at least $325,829.

  • May 08, 2024

    Auto Cos. Brace For EV Battery Compliance Hurdles

    New federal regulations aimed at shoring up the domestic electric vehicle manufacturing supply chain give automakers a much-needed two-year cushion to navigate a compliance minefield, and to figure out how to reinvigorate the recent waning consumer demand for electric vehicles.

  • May 08, 2024

    Gibson Dunn Adds Ex-Wachtell, Paul Weiss Attys As Partners

    Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP has added a former Wachtell Lipton Rosen & Katz corporate attorney and a former Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP lawyer who specializes in liability management as partners in New York, the firm has announced.

  • May 08, 2024

    DOE Unveils Preliminary National Transmission Corridors List

    The U.S. Department of Energy unveiled Wednesday a preliminary list of 10 national interest electric transmission corridors as part of its plan to accelerate the development of transmission projects in areas with urgent need for expanded capacity.

  • May 07, 2024

    2nd Circ. Weighs Border Wall Fraud Juror's Tie To Prosecution

    A Colorado man convicted of scheming to defraud donors to a campaign to build a southern border wall told the Second Circuit on Tuesday that his trial was tainted by a juror's family connection to the prosecution team.

  • May 07, 2024

    DOI Gives States And Tribes $148M For Drought Resiliency

    The U.S. Department of the Interior has said it has invested nearly $148 million to help states and Native American tribes prepare for water reliability challenges due to drought and other scarcity concerns, saying the money will go to 42 projects in 10 states.

  • May 07, 2024

    Lender Shanks Bid To Halt Ga. Golf Course Auctions

    A Georgia federal judge on Tuesday denied successive efforts from a lender to wrest control of the assets of an Atlanta-area golf club owner, whom attorneys for the lender describe as a "serial fraudster" likely to abscond with his assets while still owing millions on a 2023 loan.

Expert Analysis

  • New Hydrogen Regulations Show The Need For IP Protections

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    The introduction of hydrogen regulations, such as the IRS' proposed tax credit for clean hydrogen under the Inflation Reduction Act, are reshaping the competitive landscape, with intellectual property rights an area of increased emphasis, say Evan Glass and James De Vellis at Foley & Lardner.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Gulf Cooperation Council

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    The Gulf Cooperation Council is in the early stages of ESG policy implementation, but recent commitments by both states and corporations — including increases in sustainable finance transactions, environmental commitments, female representation on boards and human rights enforcement — show continuing progress toward broader ESG goals, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Don't Sit On Bankruptcy Sidelines, 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent In re: Louisiana Pellets decision, holding that a creditor couldn’t assert indemnification defenses in a suit brought by the trustee of a liquidation trust, highlights the risks faced by creditors and other contract parties that choose not to participate in a bankruptcy, say Gregory Hesse and Kaleb Bailey at Hunton.

  • Challenges Remain In Financing Energy Transition Minerals

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    COP28, the latest U.N. climate conference, reached a consensus on a just and equitable transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy, but more action and funding will be needed to ensure that developed countries responsibly source the minerals that will be critical for this process, say attorneys at Watson Farley.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Opinion

    New La. Gas Pipeline Projects Must Respect Rules And Rights

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    As pipeline developers rush to join in Louisiana's Haynesville Shale gas boom, established operators like Energy Transfer are justified in demanding that newer entrants respect safety rules, regulatory requirements and property rights when proposing routes that would cross existing pipelines, says Joshua Campbell at Campbell Law.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • The Corporate Disclosure Tug-Of-War's Free Speech Issues

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    The continuing conflict over corporate disclosure requirements — highlighted by a lawsuit against Missouri's anti-ESG rules — has important implications not just for investors and regulated entities but also for broader questions about the scope of the First Amendment, say Colin Pohlman, and Jane Luxton and Paul Kisslinger at Lewis Brisbois.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

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    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Vagueness In Calif. Climate Law Makes Compliance Tricky

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    California's recently enacted Voluntary Carbon Market Disclosures Act requires companies making claims of carbon neutrality, or significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions, to disclose information supporting those claims — but vague and conflicting language in the statute poses multiple problems for businesses, say John Rousakis and Chris Bowman at O'Melveny.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Harmonizing Agricultural And Clean Energy Goals

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    Congress' extension of the Farm Bill offers a chance to more thoroughly consider innovation and investments that could transform the competition between farmers and solar developers into synergistic agrivoltaic systems, which use land for both agriculture and solar energy generation, say attorneys at Husch Blackwell.

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