Sports & Betting

  • June 26, 2024

    Mich. Patron Sues MGM Over Denial Of $127K Blackjack Prize

    A Michigan woman filed a lawsuit on Wednesday seeking to collect a $127,000 jackpot that MGM Resorts International refused to pay out after claiming the patron was trespassing following a panhandling incident that got her blacklisted from the casino.

  • June 26, 2024

    Tennis Player Looks To Preserve $9M Verdict Against USTA

    Tennis pro Kylie McKenzie has urged a Florida federal court to keep intact a $9 million judgment and deny the U.S. Tennis Association's bid for a new trial, arguing the organization is liable for the sexual assault she suffered at the hands of her coach.

  • June 26, 2024

    Veteran NBA Agent Says Klutch, Paul Owe Him $4.9M In Fees

    Longtime NBA player agent Mark Termini has sued Klutch Sports Group and superagent Rich Paul in Ohio federal court for $4.9 million, claiming that Paul owes him fees for helping negotiate several lucrative contracts, including those for LeBron James.

  • June 26, 2024

    MNC Capital Makes 'Final' $3.2B Offer For Vista Outdoor

    MNC Capital Partners LP said Wednesday it has bumped up its all-cash offer to buy Vista Outdoor Inc. to $42 per share, or about $3.2 billion, in its final bid to scoop up the sporting goods maker.

  • June 25, 2024

    Disney Must Face Trimmed ESPN Streaming Fee Antitrust Suit

    A California federal judge on Tuesday threw out some antitrust claims in a sprawling proposed class action over Disney's ESPN livestreaming carriage agreements, although he permitted other portions of the suit to proceed, finding that consumers have adequately alleged Disney's actions could have hobbled competition.

  • June 25, 2024

    NFL Moves To Sack Commercial Class In Sunday Ticket Trial

    An attorney for the NFL argued on the eve of closing arguments Tuesday that jurors shouldn't be allowed to consider damages for one of two plaintiff classes in a multibillion-dollar antitrust trial over the league's DirecTV Sunday Ticket television package. 

  • June 25, 2024

    Sporting Cos. Must Face Shotgun Shell Maker's TM Suit

    A shotgun shell producer's failure to search the internet for violations of his trademark does not make the claims in his lawsuit untimely, a Georgia federal judge ruling Tuesday, saying a majority of claims related to the use of his "Quik-Shok" mark fall within the allowable time limits for lodging a challenge.

  • June 25, 2024

    Judge Tosses Skiers' Last Bid For COVID Shutdown Damages

    A final attempt by ski pass holders to receive damages after resort giant Vail Corp. shut down during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 ended Tuesday when a Colorado federal judge dismissed the putative class action and its breach-of-contract claim.

  • June 25, 2024

    Cardinals Want Arbitration In, Family Out Of Defamation Suit

    The Arizona Cardinals, owner Michael Bidwill and their crisis communications company and law firm, which collectively lost an NFL defamation grievance by a former team executive earlier this year, now want a federal defamation suit sent to league-mandated arbitration.

  • June 25, 2024

    Sinclair Accused Of Violating Video Privacy Law

    Sinclair Inc. was hit with a lawsuit in Illinois state court Monday alleging it uses tracking technology to see which videos users watch on its tennis streaming service and target advertisements to them accordingly, in violation of the Video Privacy Protection Act.

  • June 25, 2024

    USA Swimming's Suit Against Watchdog Can Continue

    A nonprofit watchdog cannot escape possible financial ramifications related to a botched investigation into false sexual misconduct accusations, after a Colorado state judge ruled it must face an indemnification lawsuit brought by USA Swimming after the accused boy's mother sued the organization.  

  • June 25, 2024

    UK Billionaire's Pilot Avoids Prison For Insider Trading

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced a former private jet pilot to house arrest Tuesday for insider trading on stock tips from his billionaire boss Joe Lewis, finding that a prison term would be unfair in comparison to Lewis' non-incarceratory sentence.

  • June 24, 2024

    UFC Fighters Swing Again To Get OK On $335M Wage Deal

    UFC fighters seeking preliminary approval for their $335 million deal to end class claims that the mixed martial arts organization suppressed their wages submitted a revised distribution plan Monday, after a Nevada federal judge said he wanted to see "life changing" money for fighters who waited through the decadelong litigation.

  • June 24, 2024

    Radio Host Says Politics Behind 'All Lives Matter' Tweet Firing

    A former radio announcer for the Sacramento Kings is forging ahead with his wrongful termination suit in California federal court, emphasizing that broadcaster Bonneville International Corp.'s decision to fire him after he tweeted "All Lives Matter" following the 2020 murder of George Floyd was politically motivated.

  • June 24, 2024

    Harvard Prof Calls NFL Sunday Ticket 'Highly Anticompetitive'

    A Harvard law professor testified Monday in a multibillion-dollar antitrust lawsuit over the NFL's Sunday Ticket that pooling teams' television rights into exclusive deals is not like Beyoncé having an exclusive music distributor — as an NFL expert testified — but like Beyoncé, Rihanna, Taylor Swift and Billie Eilish pooling rights.

  • June 24, 2024

    Doctor Left Text Trail Describing NBA Fraud Scheme, Jury Told

    Prosecutors told a Manhattan federal jury that a Seattle medical professional sent a series of text messages detailing a plan to submit fraudulent claims to an NBA healthcare plan to obtain payouts, kicking off a second trial over the alleged scheme.

  • June 24, 2024

    Flag Football Co. Fights To Keep TM Dispute Alive

    A simmering feud over the national leadership of flag football within the U.S. has intensified in Texas federal court, with the organization challenging the group holding itself out as the sport's governing body urging the judge to keep the dispute alive.

  • June 24, 2024

    Seyfarth Atty Dropped From Yeshiva U. Rape Cover-Up Suit

    A female Yeshiva University student who claims she was raped by a player on the men's basketball team, then sued the school claiming it conspired on a cover-up with Seyfarth Shaw LLP, has voluntarily dismissed two Yeshiva officials and a Seyfarth attorney from the lawsuit.

  • June 24, 2024

    Junior Leaguers Are Offsides On Antitrust Claims, NHL Says

    The NHL is looking to squash a putative antitrust class action from players in its developmental leagues alleging exploitation and abuse, telling a New York federal court that such disputes over pay and work conditions fall under the league's collective bargaining agreement and are shielded from antitrust scrutiny.

  • June 24, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Amendments to Delaware's General Corporation Law topped the news out of the Court of Chancery again last week, as the hotly contested measure sailed through the state's legislature. Tesla and its shareholders continued their tug-of-war over attorney fees for Chancery litigation about Elon Musk's pay package, and new cases were filed involving biotechs, car rental companies, workout platforms, telecom towers, and a cargo ship fire in Brazil.

  • June 24, 2024

    Insurer Says Paralympic Org Not Covered In Sex Abuse Row

    The U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee should have no coverage in a lawsuit accusing it of negligence after a Paralympic swimmer said he was sexually abused by a teammate, an insurer for the committee told a Colorado federal court, citing an "absolute abuse or molestation" exclusion. 

  • June 24, 2024

    CSG Ups Purchase Price For Vista's Kinetic Group To $2B

    Marking the latest update in its bid to scoop up Vista Outdoor Inc.'s various businesses, Czech defense company Czechoslovak Group AS has raised its proposal to purchase Vista's sporting products division to $2 billion, a $90 million increase over the original price lobbed by the defense company back in October.

  • June 21, 2024

    Under Armour To Pay $434M To End Securities Fraud Claims

    Under Armour Inc. has agreed to shell out $434 million to put to rest claims it inflated stock prices by hiding declining demand for its products, investors announced Friday, reaching a deal just weeks before a jury trial was set to kick off in Maryland federal court.

  • June 21, 2024

    Chicago Cubs Cry Foul Over Rooftop Owner's Ticket Sales

    The Chicago Cubs have sued the owner of a rooftop venue with a view of Wrigley Field, accusing him of selling tickets for Cubs games and other events at the stadium despite having an expired license to do so and profiting off the infringement of the Cubs' intellectual property rights.

  • June 21, 2024

    NCAA Teams May Suffer Without Int'l Student Pay Regs

    The historic $2.77 billion settlement to address college athletes' alleged lost compensation on name, image and likeness deals could have an adverse effect on university team rosters if the federal government fails to level the playing field for international athletes.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Being An Equestrian Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Beyond getting experience thinking on my feet and tackling stressful situations, the skills I've gained from horseback riding have considerable overlap with the skills used to practice law, particularly in terms of team building, continuing education, and making an effort to reset and recharge, says Kerry Irwin at Moore & Van Allen.

  • 4 Ways To Refresh Your Law Firm's Marketing Strategy

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    With many BigLaw firms relying on an increasingly obsolete marketing approach that prioritizes stiff professionalism over authentic connection, adopting a few key communications strategies to better connect with today's clients and prospects can make all the difference, say Eric Pacifici and Kevin Henderson at SMB Law.

  • What Have We Learned In The Year Since Warhol?

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    In the almost year since the U.S. Supreme Court decided Andy Warhol Foundation v. Goldsmith, which was widely seen as potentially chilling to creative endeavors, seven subsequent decisions — while illuminating to some extent — do not indicate any trend toward a radical departure from prior precedents in fair use cases, says ​​​​​​​Jose Sariego at Bilzin Sumberg.

  • Clemson's ACC Exit Fee Suit May Have Major Consequences

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    Clemson University's recent suit in South Carolina state court against the Atlantic Coast Conference, which challenges the ACC's $140 million exit fee and its ownership of member schools' media rights, would likely have enormous ramifications for ACC members in the event of a definitive court ruling, say William Sullivan and Alex Anderson at Pillsbury.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Opinion

    Anti-DEI Complaints Filed With EEOC Carry No Legal Weight

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    Recently filed complaints against several companies' diversity, equity and inclusion programs alleging unlawful discrimination against white people do not require a response from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and should not stop employers from rooting out ongoing discriminatory practices, says former EEOC general counsel David Lopez.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • Defense Attys Must Prep For Imminent AI Crime Enforcement

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    Given recent statements by U.S. Department of Justice officials, white collar practitioners should expect to encounter artificial intelligence in federal criminal enforcement in the near term, even in pending cases, say Jarrod Schaeffer and Scott Glicksman at Abell Eskew.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

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